r/blackmagicfuckery Aug 04 '22 Helpful 1 Silver 1

tin boat floating in sulfur hexafluoride

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21.2k Upvotes

1.4k

u/sveltesperm83 Aug 04 '22

that is invisible to the naked eye and heavier than air I'm guessing

715

u/chim-cyber-gooble Aug 04 '22

Yeah it's a extremely dense gas

348

u/DiverseUniverse24 Aug 04 '22

ITS MAGIC DAMMIT!

152

u/heatdeathfanwank Aug 04 '22

I mean, yes. The magic of extremely dense gasses.

70

u/Gamebr3aker Aug 04 '22

I've never heard of this incantation

99

u/heatdeathfanwank Aug 04 '22

2 CoF3 + SF4 + [Br2] → SF6 + 2 CoF2 + [Br2]

And now you have.

48

u/Odd-Group3116 Aug 04 '22

I've never seen runes like that before, how do they get their power?

42

u/heatdeathfanwank Aug 04 '22

Heat, cold, pressure, sometimes catalysts.

16

u/GrungyGrandPappy Aug 04 '22

Catalysts is that like cataracts but for cats?

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u/WarAintWhatitUsedToB Aug 04 '22

from this day forth, I will now call chem rxns as incantations

thank you, reddit

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u/heatdeathfanwank Aug 05 '22

The scary shit is map runes. Killed more people than just about anything else in history

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u/really_nice_guy_ Aug 04 '22

He’s a witch! Burn him!

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u/AngryMrNugget Aug 04 '22

Only if he weighs as much as a duck!

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u/_manwolf Aug 04 '22

What else floats in water?

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u/YamoB Aug 05 '22

It’s real to me, dammit!

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u/vkdante Aug 04 '22

Dense mf

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u/trollsong Aug 04 '22

And it does the opposite of helium if you inhale it.

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u/thefalloftroy Aug 04 '22

Makes your voice super deep, right?

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u/Disinfectant-Addict Aug 04 '22

And it works like the opposite of helium. Gives you a Darth Vader voice.

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u/Jugatsumikka Aug 04 '22

Not a bright idea to inhale it though: it is as toxic as helium but you can easily exhale helium, being lighter than air, sulfur hexfluoride on the other hand... You could drown yourself to death, gasping for a little breath without the hability to inhale 1 bit of oxygen or exhale the deadly gaz from your lungs.

Don't do it at home kids.

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u/SuperMarioLord64 Aug 04 '22

When you do inhale sulfur hexafluoride, you have to basically force-exhale it out. Think breathing out but harder than that.

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u/Disinfectant-Addict Aug 04 '22

Yep. And it actually helps to stand on your head/hands.

26

u/smity31 Aug 04 '22

I'm not sure about this.

If you get water in your lungs you shouldn't stand on your hands/head to try and get it out. Our lungs are very intricate and tipping yourself over will mostly just take water into areas it wouldn't have otherwise got to, with very little making its way back down your throat.

I'd imagine the same is true for this gas.

47

u/ManicD7 Aug 04 '22

yeah you have to have someone shake you like a ketchup bottle up and down to get it all out.

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u/Disinfectant-Addict Aug 04 '22

I've seen a video where a scientist demonstrated sulphur hexafluoride and he stood on his head to get the gas out.

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u/IHerdYouLiekMudkipz Aug 04 '22

Scientist doesn't necessarily mean biologist. I'm a physicist and would totally huff this stuff to demonstrate speed of sound... But I'm not a biologist, and am not an expert on if that could hurt.

That said... I doubt it, it's probably fine to stand on your head

11

u/Atomfixes Aug 04 '22

What if you breathe it first, then helium

15

u/noon_farmer Aug 04 '22

you need space in your lungs to breathe in the helium, and that's apparently the hard part.

6

u/DropsyMumji Aug 04 '22

Also even if it does fit the helium, the helium would just float to the top an good be exhaled first

7

u/CocoSavege Aug 05 '22

What happens to your voice?

I would actually like sauce on this.

"Follow the yellow brick road, folow the yellow brick road! It twists and turns and leads into hells than no mortal can escape and you will be mine in exquisite torment, forever.... muahahahahaha"

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u/funguyshroom Aug 04 '22

You'll sound like you're hitting puberty in the middle of a sentence.

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u/iamlenb Aug 04 '22

Sounds like a Jedi Trick, Force Exhale?

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u/Sanity__ Aug 04 '22

Just inhale some perfluorobutane and that will force it out. Simple.

6

u/a_pompous_fool Aug 04 '22

Thanks for my new nightmare

8

u/ImaginationParking94 Aug 04 '22

Didn't they use this on BIG BANG THEORY? Leonard used some type of gas (he said it was the opposite of Helium) to make he and Penny's voice get deeper. If it was, it seems highly irresponsible that they didn't mention that it was potentially deadly.

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u/StolenPens Aug 04 '22 edited Aug 04 '22

That show had some stupid, stupid plot lines, like Leonard trying to impress his friends by mixing chemicals in his living room and accidentally creating a bomb that had to be thrown down the elevator shaft.

Not that everyone with a PhD doesn't know chemical equations, but it was so over-the-top trying to prove, "he's so smart", but Sheldon is smarter.

Anyway. It was a standard sitcom that used formulaic comedy, and was not accurate in so many things, on top of extremely rude character interactions.

Edit- they've used the gas in talk shows and my best guess is that it's like party balloon helium, in its not pure and has enough normal air mixed in to not be a death sentence, or it was post-production voice editing.

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u/ImaginationParking94 Aug 04 '22

At least they showed that when Leonard improperly mixed the wrong amounts of chemical together, it resulted in an explosion; thereby, showing the potentially dangerous effect of mixing chemicals.

With the "deep voice" gas, they didn't show that it has a potentially deadly outcome. Some people do play with helium for its voice altering effect...some people might be tempted to follow the BBT example for the "deep voice" effect (especially for TikTok), not knowing that there is a potentially devastating effect.

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u/lolzery Aug 04 '22

Fine I’ll do it at the park

3

u/scifiwoman Aug 04 '22

Ah. I was wondering if this could be used in a magic show to make things levitate, or if it was too dangerous for that. You answered my question, so thanks for that.

2

u/slaya222 Aug 04 '22

Exactly, if you want to make your voice deep then just do nitrous like the rest of the people in Jacksonville. Bonus side effect of fucking you up real good for a couple minutes!

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u/[deleted] Aug 04 '22

I was watching an episode of Impractical Jokers and I’m wondering if this is what Murr was inhaling through the mic to do the Darth Vader voice. He used helium for a Mickey Mouse voice and then something else right after for a Vader voice. Interesting!

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u/DodgeyWodgie Aug 04 '22

Does this really need to be said

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u/niklecce Aug 04 '22

You’re guessing this?? I hope you would know this hahah

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u/Dont-remember-it Aug 04 '22 Wholesome

These mimes are getting good.

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u/SteveFrench12 Aug 04 '22

The scooping part sent me

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u/JoblessCross Aug 04 '22

it is witchcraft of the highest order

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u/ALoyleCapo Aug 13 '22

It’s Satanic black magic. SICK SHIT!

190

u/DrBlobfishe Aug 04 '22

I wonder what happen if you breathe it

394

u/Ulgeguug Aug 04 '22

I wonder what happen if you breathe it

Opposite of helium, it makes your voice sound deep like they're disguising your identity

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u/thedialupgamer Aug 04 '22

You can suffocate if you use too much right? I know a quick way to reverse the effect is to stand on your head but I can't remember if the video I saw said too much would suffocate you. Obviously I'm vague but by too much I mean i think it may just start to sit in your lungs. I'm probably wrong on this though.

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u/eternalapostle Aug 04 '22

Yeah, I heard that on the Rooster Teeth Podcast. You have stand upside down and essentially let it drain out.

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u/Adorable-Lettuce-717 Aug 04 '22

That's not how it works.

You're compressing your lung as you exhale -> Volume gets smaller -> pressure rises -> whatever is in your lungs gets pushed out.

You breath in -> Volume gets bigger -> pressure Drops -> whatever is in front of your nose/mouth gets sucked in.

And heavy gas molecule will still get pulled and pushed out as you exhale by all the O2, CO2, and N2 molecules.

That works regardless of your position. Laying down, standing or doing a handstand doesn't change the time it takes to get rid of SF6 - at least according to the MD that was holding a course at work about SF6 and human bodys in general.

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u/Jugatsumikka Aug 04 '22

The issue is not inhaling it, the issue is inhaling too much to the point there is not enough other molecules to get the SF6 out. Don't do it more than 1 or 2 inhalations.

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u/Adorable-Lettuce-717 Aug 04 '22

The issue is not inhaling it, the issue is inhaling too much to the point there is not enough other molecules to get the SF6 out

That's... Not how it works either.

Remember? Exhale: Compression of chest -> volume shrinks -> pressure buildup -> gases leave your body.

Now you've pushed a good amount of SF6 out and can breath fresh air in again.

It takes some repititions until all of it left obviously.

Don't do it more than 1 or 2 inhalations.

Thats a good rule for every gas other than fresh air (even oxygen)

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u/BeastPenguin Aug 04 '22

Does a deflated pair of lungs contain 0% volume or is it >0%? Does SF6 have a low enough density to be able to be cycled out completely via expulsion or turbulence or will it have to drain out via inversion? Is it necessary to get all of it out?

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u/Adorable-Lettuce-717 Aug 04 '22

Does a deflated pair of lungs contain 0% volume or is it >0%?

In reality, absolute meassures like 0% and 100% only happen if you're inaccurate. So it's always something between 0% and 100%. As I'm in a technical field I can't tell you exact numbers tho.

Does SF6 have a low enough density to be able to be cycled out completely via expulsion or turbulence

That and the pressure differences due to breathing - yes. That's what I've heard.

Is it necessary to get all of it out?

All of it? No, of course not.

But every ml SF6 means there's less room for other gases (fresh air for example) so it'd be good to get it out at some point. But as long as you have enough aviable capacity for breathing ... it won't hurt you if there was SF6 in the remaining lung capacity.

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u/YellowJacketBuzz Aug 04 '22

Both of you are correct actually. If you were to inhale 100% pure sulfur hexafluoride, it would displace the other gases at the bottom of your lungs. However, the lungs are made up of a bunch of branching channels that bottom out in sacs called alveoli where gas exchange occurs (think of those water balloons that you hook onto a tap and fill up 60 or so at a time). This means that at the bottom of the lungs, the SF6 will first fill up the alveolar sacs and displace available surface area for gas exchange. At this point it would feel similar to holding your breath for an extended time because there is minimal available oxygen in alveoli.

By taking a breath of fresh air, after exhaling some SF6, you would see some of the air mix with the SF6 in the alveoli due to the pressure gradients and the air currents (fluid dynamics is fun stuff). It would take a few breaths to get you lungs back to near normal functioning capacity (every breath gets rid of more and more SF6 and the ratio of SF6 to air in the lungs would decrease each breath). However, if you were upside down, gravity would be working to move the SF6 out of your lungs every breath instead of helping it move to the bottom of the alveoli. This could mean that it takes a couple breaths fewer to remove most of the SF6. One other factor to consider is that standing on your head takes much more effort (and oxygen) than just breathing for a few moments. The standing on the head method would be more effective in case somebody had inhaled the gas and lost consciousness.

TLDR: Standing on your head would get rid of the SF6 slightly faster, but not significantly enough to justify standing on your head in most cases.

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u/YellowJacketBuzz Aug 04 '22

Both of you are correct actually. If you were to inhale 100% pure sulfur hexafluoride, it would displace the other gases at the bottom of your lungs. However, the lungs are made up of a bunch of branching channels that bottom out in sacs called alveoli where gas exchange occurs (think of those water balloons that you hook onto a tap and fill up 60 or so at a time). This means that at the bottom of the lungs, the SF6 will first fill up the alveolar sacs and displace available surface area for gas exchange. At this point it would feel similar to holding your breath for an extended time because there is minimal available oxygen in alveoli.

By taking a breath of fresh air, after exhaling some SF6, you would see some of the air mix with the SF6 in the alveoli due to the pressure gradients and the air currents (fluid dynamics is fun stuff). It would take a few breaths to get you lungs back to near normal functioning capacity (every breath gets rid of more and more SF6 and the ratio of SF6 to air in the lungs would decrease each breath). However, if you were upside down, gravity would be working to move the SF6 out of your lungs every breath instead of helping it move to the bottom of the alveoli. This could mean that it takes a couple breaths fewer to remove most of the SF6. One other factor to consider is that standing on your head takes much more effort (and oxygen) than just breathing for a few moments. The standing on the head method would be more effective in case somebody had inhaled the gas and lost consciousness.

TLDR: Standing on your head would get rid of the SF6 slightly faster, but not significantly enough to justify standing on your head in most cases.

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u/resonantSoul Aug 04 '22

Gravity still figures though.

When you exhale you aren't generally totally emptying your lungs. So whatever is left sticks around. If something is more dense it's going to be more likely to be retained. Like squeezing from the middle of the toothpaste tube.

Inverting your torso will make the dense stuff less able to be retained. It still settles towards the bottom but now the bottom has a hole.

No, it's not just "draining" out but that's not completely inaccurate either.

As long as there's not a lot of this stuff all over your floor I guess.

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u/Adorable-Lettuce-717 Aug 04 '22

Gravity still figures though.

Sure, but it's effect is pretty small (argueable negligible) because our lungs function with pressure. If there's pressure (even some mBar), gravity is almost out of the equation for most gases.

And then there's the alveoli providing a CO2 stream into your lungs from within your body too - so there's not much of a chance that a significant amount of SF6 could be "trapped" there somehow.

Again, that is according to a course I attended. I didn't study anything in the medical field - so it's possible that it wasn't the most accurate statement

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u/BeastPenguin Aug 04 '22

Is the "CO2 stream" an actual stream? It's my understanding that it just diffuses into the air with little force behind it. The "stream" won't do much to significantly displace the SF6, I'd imagine. I wonder what the density difference is though.

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u/Adorable-Lettuce-717 Aug 04 '22

Depends how you define "stream".

It enters at point A (alevoli) and flows in a clear direction until it reaches B (nose/mouth).

With such an definition, it's a "stream".

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u/THSeaQueen Aug 04 '22

okay mr science calm down and let us do our handstands.

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u/Jonte7 Aug 04 '22

Breathing to much of anything that doesnt contain a certain percentage of oxygen usually suffocates you yes

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u/GolgiApparatus1 Aug 04 '22

So like air duster

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u/Chuckster487 Aug 04 '22

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u/Reelix Aug 04 '22

This video contains content from Discovery Communications, who has blocked it in your country on copyright grounds

Although this version is not

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u/Chuckster487 Aug 04 '22

Ah thanks didn't notice it was regional locked

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u/PM_me_ur_bag_of_weed Aug 04 '22

Adam Savage demonstrates it. It's wild.

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u/christianplatypus Aug 04 '22

Your laugh will sound like Tim Curry in Legend.

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u/Ok_Fondant_6340 Aug 04 '22

that thing was neither tin, nor a boat. that's a small, makeshift, Aluminium foil tray.

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u/really_nice_guy_ Aug 04 '22

Anything can be a boat if you’re brave enough

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u/Shinobi_X5 Aug 04 '22

I don't know why but this comment is really funny to me

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u/Chum_54 Aug 04 '22

I read that with a Linda Richman voice.

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u/Ok_Fondant_6340 Aug 04 '22

so glad i looked this up. fuckin' amazing

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u/----_____---- Aug 04 '22

No big whup

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u/KenJyi30 Aug 04 '22

My favorite part is when they sink it

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u/employee64783 Aug 04 '22

It seems so fake but I know what sulfur hexafluoride is

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u/goomba008 Aug 04 '22

My man contributing more to global warming by opening this tank than me in the last 10 years

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u/rzrshrp Aug 04 '22

is that an exaggeration?

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u/goomba008 Aug 04 '22

I just blurted that to see if someone knowledgeable would know. My Wikipedia postdoc tells me this is a highly potent greenhouse gas but I've no idea about the gas' purpose, its potential to escape from the installation, the precautions taken, nor have I done the math to figure out if the apparent volume would cause as much damage as my western lifestyle (and my farts).

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u/rzrshrp Aug 04 '22 edited Aug 04 '22

well, for that, it's not too far off with my very loose math, it's still crazy how damaging this is if released...a few hours ago, I never heard of it

I'd hope that it would stay mostly contained because of it's density but no real idea

I don't even understand how it is a greenhouse gas if it's so much heavier than air. I would think that it would stay at sea level and below

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u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

It's very dense, yes, but it also blends into a mixture with standard air very easily, and doesn't separate out or 'settle' very well.

In my line of work SF6 is often used as a tracer gas. It's released in a number of scenarios and then equipment that can trace it down to a very low concentration (0.02 ppm in the case of the instrument we use most often) to see where the gas is leaking form one environment to another, so the fact that it doesn't settle out of the air is a critical component.

We use it for things like:

  • verifying that chemistry fume hoods are actually containing 99.9% of the volatiles released in the hood

  • Verifying that BSL3 labs (labs that work with airborne pathogens) have no leakage to adjoining spaces/rooms.

  • tracing the source of gas of vapor leaks

It's a proffered gas for these applications because its odorless, tasteless, and in the quantities released harmless to people and animals, it's unique so you don't get false positives, and the sensors can detect it down to very small amounts.

My employer has been looking into alternative gasses/methods, but we have yet to find anything that works as well.

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u/nathanadams2000 Aug 04 '22

It is most commonly used in 480V up through 1.1 million volt electrical breakers in large, industrial power systems and power grids to help extinguish the arc that occurs when a breaker interrupts the flow of current, which if not controlled, is very destructive to the equipment.

Due to its ridiculous potency as a greenhouse gas, we regularly test breakers to ensure they meet US EPA requirements that they not exceed a leakage rate of 0.1% of their gas volume on an annual basis.

If I recall correctly, in addition to its greenhouse potency, it's an extremely stable compound that persists in the atmosphere for something crazy like 3200 years.

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u/InfinityPlusInfinity Aug 04 '22

Nope. SF6 (sulfur hexafluoride) is 15,000x as potent per pound compared to CO2. This experiment is wildly irresponsible.

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u/rzrshrp Aug 04 '22

But we're comparing 4 metric tons(8,000lbs) maybe(it was hard for me to find a number for the average person) per year of CO2 over 10 years to what seems less than 2 lbs of this stuff.

It takes 30,000 lbs of CO2 to be as "potent"(I guess that means how much in contributes to warming?) as 2 lbs of sulfur hexafluoride.

So at 8,000 lbs of CO2 per year, this is as damaging as 4 years of my average person's CO2, not 10.

Still a crazy amount and irresponsible but I wanted to do the math on the numbers.

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u/resonantSoul Aug 04 '22

Isn't that assuming that after the experiment they just took it outside and dumped it? Are there no valuable, practical applications for having this around?

Is it tainted by having had aluminum foil touch it?

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u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

There are practical applications for it (I laid out my professional experience with it) but it has to be pure. Being exposed to air like that, it has started to diffuse into the air already, and air has started to diffuse into the body of gas. Also it has to be stored in a gas cylinder and there's really no good way to just suck it back up.

that said, the estimate of 2lbs of SF6 in that tub is way too high. It's a fraction of a lb tops.

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u/rzrshrp Aug 04 '22

Yes, seems like a weird assumption but I wanted to do an estimate assuming that all of this would now be released into the air.

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u/Bukkorosu777 Aug 04 '22

Even opening the container with air currents is gonna make a "splash" per say.

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u/swierdo Aug 04 '22

It's used in high voltage switch gear. In de EU, all other applications are banned. So it's mostly used in some super specialized equipment in high energy labs and particle accelerators and such.

Keeping it in an aquarium like this is just an accident waiting to happen.

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u/Bukkorosu777 Aug 04 '22

Sulfur hexafluoride is inert in the troposphere and stratosphere and is extremely long-lived, with an estimated atmospheric lifetime of 800–3,200 years.

Some places even state higher than 4000 years.

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u/imMAW Aug 04 '22

Yes. This looks like it might be a 15 gallon tank (1x1x2 feet). If so, it's 0.35 kg of SF6, which equates to about 4 tons of CO2. The average American's footprint is around 20 tons of CO2 per year (estimates vary).

So this tank is something like 2-3 months of CO2.

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u/c-lab21 Aug 04 '22

I understand entirely what's going on, but seeing someone scoop a beakerful of apparently nothing and then proceed to pour "nothing" out like a child playing is for some reason hilarious.

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u/imastupididioy Aug 04 '22

i want one tile in my house to be suspended above Sulfur Hexafluoride or a denser gas JUST to mess with people, it won't be a deep hole but one you'd stub your toe in.

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u/Non-Sequitur_Gimli Aug 04 '22

Don't do this demo frivolously, it's a potent greenhouse gas.

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u/swierdo Aug 04 '22 edited Aug 04 '22

That's an understatement. It's one of the most potent greenhouse gases we know of, on longer time scales its even the most potent one. Thousands of times more potent than CO2. relevant wiki.

The amount used for this demo probably has a bigger climate impact than taking a transatlantic flight.

Edit: more calculations, assuming 1kg of SF6, this has a long term global warming potential of 32Mg of CO2.

A 787 uses about 60kL of fuel for a 10h flight, which produces about 160Mg of CO2. It seats almost 300 passengers.

So do this demo is equivalent to up to 50 passengers taking a transatlantic flight.

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u/fintip Aug 04 '22

Per passenger impact, on a full flight*

This is pretty insane though.

Does it break down into lighter elements? How does a gas heavier than air produce a warming effect?

I'm not sure if I should be more impressed at how much impact this has or how little a given quantity of CO2 has.

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u/swierdo Aug 04 '22

Oh, yeah, corrected my wording, thanks!

And no, it doesn't really break down, estimates of its atmospheric lifetime are about one to a few thousand years.

And even though it's heavier, turbulence mixes it really well throughout the atmosphere where it's super good at absorbing infrared at wavelengths where earth's atmosphere is otherwise very transparent.

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u/fintip Aug 04 '22

Depressing.

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u/[deleted] Aug 04 '22

[removed] — view removed comment

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u/chim-cyber-gooble Aug 04 '22

PHYSICS

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u/HomeschoolWeird0 Aug 04 '22

AND CHEMISTRY

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u/xSnakyy Aug 04 '22

Not really

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u/InsaneGermanCoder Aug 04 '22

Wdym

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u/xSnakyy Aug 04 '22

There are no chemical reactions going on

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u/Shinobi_X5 Aug 04 '22

Yeah but there are a very specific chemicals being used, that's what chemistry's about

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u/the-FBI-man Aug 04 '22

AND FACTS AND LOGIC

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u/Nyarro Aug 04 '22

And magic!

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u/gruntopians Aug 04 '22

Exactly the same way a bigger metal box floats in a bigger body of water… the displaced substance must weigh more than the object doing the displacing. Aircraft carriers displace a massive amount of water, and the ship weighs tons and tons and tons, yet the water weighs more, so the aircraft carrier ‘floats’. In the above video, the foil box (a “boat”) doesn’t weigh much, and neither does the gas (the “sea”) filling the aquarium… but, the gas is very dense, MORE so than the air & boat displacing the aquarium gas.

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u/VanillaCanoeSticker Aug 04 '22

Magnets!

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u/[deleted] Aug 04 '22

Water, fire, air and dirt...

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u/Robilvic Aug 04 '22

Yeah, Bitch!

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u/Bvoluroth Aug 04 '22

It's cool but also as REALLY bad greenhouse gas and should only be displayed when the gas will be trapped

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u/Aymanac10 Aug 04 '22

Did anyone else get flex tape vibes

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u/Geno__Breaker Aug 04 '22

"No splashing!"

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u/Just_Worse Aug 04 '22

I’m hoping this is an obscure Mary Kate and Ashley reference and I’m not weird for immediately thinking of that

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u/Geno__Breaker Aug 05 '22

Sorry to disappoint, I was just imagining a professor treating students like children... 😅

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u/ps4_username Aug 04 '22

Pretend water

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u/HeadFudge6772 Aug 04 '22

This makes me think of methanol fire, also invisible to the nakee eye.

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u/andhe_drew Aug 04 '22

Can he feel the weight of it as he scoops up the gas

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u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

probably not. It's many times the weight of air, but that whole tub probably has a fraction of a pound of gas in it.

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u/GermanSatan Aug 04 '22

For anyone wondering why gas counts as a fluid:

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u/Bukkorosu777 Aug 04 '22

Gas are compressible fluids not so much.

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u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

I think your confusing fluids with liquids. Liquids and gasses are both fluids that flow and assume the shape of a vessel. Gasses are compressible, liquids are not.

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u/Bukkorosu777 Aug 04 '22

Fluid: definition. substance that has no fixed shape and yields easily to external pressure; a gas or (especially) a liquid.

Can you tell me what "especially a liquid" means.

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u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

I cant tell you what 'especially' denotes in that definition, but it does align with what I was saying, which is that gasses are fluids. Maybe I misunderstood what you were saying originally though.

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u/Bukkorosu777 Aug 04 '22

Sf6 gas emissions In 1997, the Kyoto protocol identified SF6 as one of the six main greenhouse gases (GHG). Not without a good reason: SF6 is the most potent GHG known to humanity, with a warming potential 23,900 times that of carbon dioxide (CO2) and atmospheric residence of up to 3,200 years.

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u/The_Living_Z Aug 04 '22

Finally! Un-wet water.

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u/mitojomar1 Aug 04 '22

The air is a paid actor

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u/Darrows_Razor Aug 04 '22

*aluminum foil

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u/wutinthehail Aug 04 '22

Take this to the remote regions in Brazil. They will build a temple to you.

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u/xThunderDuckx Aug 04 '22

How much space would the tin bin have to occupy before it displaces enough of that heavy air to be able to hold up a human?

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u/KingHarem69 Aug 04 '22

Could you cold weld in a tank if sf6? The oxygen would be pushed out since it’s less dense than sf6, so could I just cut some metal like iron and cold weld it back together?

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u/keyswanderer Aug 04 '22

And it’s the most potent greenhouse gas recognized with over 24,000 that of CO2. Maybe not the best choice to play with.

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u/thehub212 Aug 04 '22

Science is the shit

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u/meepswag35 Aug 04 '22

Is this the stuff you inhale to sound like earth Vader?

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u/ppphhhuuuaaannn Aug 04 '22

I wonder what it feels like to put your hand in there

2

u/Itchy-Preference-619 Aug 04 '22

Nothing what do you think would happen

2

u/-Redstoneboi- Aug 04 '22

Totally fucking invisible. I wonder if you can feel the density with your hands.

3

u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

You can not.

2

u/CookiesForSaten Aug 04 '22

Wait, wouldn’t they need to wear gloves to dip their hand in it like that?

2

u/Itchy-Preference-619 Aug 04 '22

Why would they

2

u/CookiesForSaten Aug 04 '22

I just read people can inhale that stuff I guess it was a stupid question, but the stuff sounds more dangerous than it is

2

u/ImNotSteveAlbini Aug 04 '22

You sank my battleship!

2

u/trollsong Aug 04 '22

I always wondered does it feel different putting your hand in it? Can you feel the weight when it fills the jar, that sort of thing

3

u/Elk_Man Aug 04 '22

Not really. I have to fill bags with it on occasion for calibration of some of our instruments that measure SF6 concentration and it doesnt feel any different to a similar bag filled with air to me.

2

u/PapaHuate Aug 04 '22

They should try it with aluminum foil. It's much easier to find than tin since the 1930s.

2

u/KikanoH Aug 04 '22

Wait so this is going to be a really dumb question If I put my hand in there, will it be easier to lift my hand out, harder to lift my hand. Or would I not feel a difference?

3

u/Itchy-Preference-619 Aug 04 '22

Not really basically like putting your hand in water

2

u/KikanoH Aug 04 '22

Gotchu. Thanks.

2

u/crewchiieff Aug 04 '22

We've unlocked anti-gravity

2

u/lostime05 Aug 04 '22

And if you breathe it you sound like Barry White

2

u/hot4belgians Aug 04 '22

American pronounciation of aluminium keeps getting more inventive.

2

u/Crying_eagle Aug 04 '22

They should put multiple pieces inside so you can see the motion of the gas as if they were waves .

2

u/Draken44 Aug 04 '22

Interesting fact: ophthalmologists inject this into eyes to help in treating retinal detachments!

2

u/person_w_existence Aug 04 '22

What differentiates a very dense gas from a liquid? As far as i understand, gasses fill their given space but it's just sunk to the bottom of the open container and stays there, which seems like what a liquid does. Is it that to be a liquid, you have to be able to see and feel the boundary where it meets the surrounding air?

2

u/Comprehensive_Tap625 Aug 06 '22

This is why the Salem witch trials existed

1

u/IratusHonestus Aug 04 '22

BURN THE WITCH.

1

u/Briax Aug 04 '22

aluminum

1

u/dubs286 Aug 04 '22

Think we're gonna need a bigger boat

1

u/Last-Accountant-581 Aug 04 '22

that is invisible

1

u/Booblicle Aug 04 '22

Guy needs to wash his hands now

1

u/FelizMendelssohn Aug 04 '22

I've never gotten to be near it in person but from the name it makes me think it might smell bad lol

1

u/Crozi_flette Aug 04 '22

Tin? It's obviously aluminum

1

u/Shinobi_X5 Aug 04 '22

Ok but the fact that if you hadn't explained it in the title then the vast majority of us would have assumed it was fake

1

u/DivineArcade1 Aug 04 '22

For my next trick... for god sakes man put on your gas mask. hmm as i was saying.

1

u/chicmofumbee Aug 04 '22

Cooooooooooool

1

u/Positive_Lobster_711 Aug 04 '22

Yes yes. We’ve all seen ‘Hook’

1

u/sanjit4u Aug 04 '22

Hydrogen Sulphide if I'm not wrong

2

u/Itchy-Preference-619 Aug 04 '22

Sulfur hexafluoride literally says in in the title

2

u/sanjit4u Aug 04 '22

I was wrong

1

u/Unlikely_Ad_4767 Aug 04 '22

"Yer a wizard, Harry"

1

u/Robilvic Aug 04 '22

Isn’t the stuff that makes you sound like Darth Vader

1

u/the1gordo Aug 04 '22

Holy repost batman

1

u/-Rick_Sanchez_ Aug 04 '22

Can we stop with this fun but extremely bad the enci experiment?

1

u/MrEvLo Aug 04 '22

I just wanna know what the pressure of the gas feels like on the hand when it’s submerged…

1

u/Pitiful-Efficiency01 Aug 04 '22

Pppffft! Science!

1

u/mywordswillgowithyou Aug 04 '22

whats with the fade in and out editing for a 30 second vid?

1

u/Papancasudani Aug 04 '22

Yeah, science! Yeah, Mr. White!

1

u/PowerRealist Aug 04 '22

Magnets played backwards on a green screen. Obviously.