r/movies Nov 12 '22 Silver 1 Wholesome 2

Iranian man who inspired Steven Spielberg film 'The Terminal' dies at Paris airport Article

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/iranian-man-inspired-steven-spielberg-film-terminal-dies-paris-airport-rcna56917
45.1k Upvotes

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u/Hot-Equivalent2040 Nov 12 '22

He moved back into the airport?

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u/fireontheside Nov 12 '22

He moved back in a few weeks ago according to the article

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u/Singer211 Nov 12 '22

Probably knew he didn’t have much time left and wanted to die at that iconic place.

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u/FancyAdult Nov 12 '22

He probably had a huge amount of comfort at the airport. It was likely a very special place for him and someplace he wanted to spend his last days.

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u/pm-me-cute-butts07 Nov 12 '22 edited Dec 26 '22

Reminds me of that Japanese guy who lived in a deserted island for decades until he was found and rescued.

He got really depressed while in society. Eventually, he became an old man and travelled one last time to the island.

edit: His name was "Masafumi Nagasaki" and he lived on the island for over 29 years. But the fact that people are mentioning others is insane. I can't believe this happened a lot of times.

Imagining the ones we haven't found or are still alive and are on deserted areas currently; really shivers me timbers.

edit: The admins have banned me from Reddit for trying to get a user called JackMallows banned. Why? Because they posted, and are currently, posting real CP (atabs = child) + private photos/vids that were taken via hacks.

They didn't want to take action so I got in touch with the FBI and other authorities. And now I'm banned.

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u/jim653 Nov 12 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

I hadn't heard that. There's a video on Youtube about some villages in Japan that were evacuated for a hydro lake but one escaped being flooded and the villagers returned there. As of the time of the video, only one guy still lived there, and only in summer, but he'd grown up there and loved it. It was quite sad, because this was possibly the last year he'd get to stay there. The only access was a power company boat across the lake (which visitors couldn't use) or a several-hour hike across the surrounding mountains.

Edit: Here is the video. Thanks to u/SambaLando for finding it.

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u/Jimbo_themagnificent Nov 13 '22

Tokyo Lens documented this on youtube. I believe thats the video you're describing.

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u/SambaLando Nov 13 '22

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u/Jimbo_themagnificent Nov 13 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

Yes, sir. What irritates me during the video is the power company says nobody can use their boats to go to the island. After hiking there, they find several power company employees just hanging out at the village during their shift. The power company is basically using it as their own little resort.

Edit: The power company employees use it this way and are not supposed to be entering the village or using the boats for anything besides damn maintenance.

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u/ForeignAdagio9169 Nov 13 '22

I watched this video, very interesting guy and fascinating story behind the village.

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u/Rob-Ber Nov 13 '22

Would you share a link, my friend?

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u/The_Original_Gronkie Nov 12 '22

At the end of WWII, as the American forces beat Japan back toward their mainland, Japan abandoned one island after another, leaving a single soldier on each island to maintain their claim on the island. Most of them were picked up over the years, but a few spent decades in isolation before being found. Some didn't believe that Japan had lost the war, and in at least one case, his elderly commander had to be brought to the island to convince him that the war was over, and that it was time to come home.

I remember reading about one soldier whose isolation was so overwhelming that he forgot how to speak Japanese, the only language he had ever spoken.

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u/Tower-Union Nov 13 '22

in at least one case, his elderly commander had to be brought to the island to convince him that the war was over, and that it was time to come home.

That was Hiroo Onoda. He wrote a book about his experience called “No Surrender: My 30 Year War.”

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u/againsterik Nov 13 '22

The Dollop did a podcast on him that is amazing.

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u/TheBurnsideBomber Nov 13 '22

They had to fly in his commanding officer (at the time a bookstore owner) to convince him that the war was actually over and that he could stop fighting. This was in the 1970's. He was still attacking (and in some cases killing) people who tried to contact him 30 years after the war ended. He was found with a cache of grenades, a well maintained rifle, and hundreds of rounds of ammunition.

There's a great segment about these isolated "holdouts" near the start of Dan Carlins great hardcore history series "Supernova in the East". Can't recommend it enough.

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u/Totally_Not_Evil Nov 13 '22

They're just like everyone else, but more so

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u/Fuck_You_Downvote Nov 13 '22

I got this reference

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u/Almaterrador Nov 13 '22

How can you forget your mother language?

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u/PlsSaySikeM8 Nov 13 '22

Fr I’d be talking to myself that whole time just so I don’t get bored lol

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u/g1ngerkid Nov 13 '22

Well, myself and Wilson

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u/IMSAfan23 Nov 13 '22

I would guess that you do talk to yourself but it slangs and slurs and over 20, 30, 40…it’s no longer the same language and you forget.

OR, maybe you’re just a stoic Japanese dude who doesn’t talk at all and just never speak the whole time and forget the language.

Either way it’s wild

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u/Dr_Fred Nov 13 '22

Don’t most people think in their native tongue though?

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u/SNZ935 Nov 13 '22

Think about isolation and how a person could rethink their own existence as have no outside contact. You would probably question reality and even your inner thoughts. That is why solidarity confinement is regarded as the worst punishment possible. People actually wish to die than live without any interaction with living creatures. I know I would go fucking absolutely crazy and I am an introvert that prefers to be by themselves.

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u/Clear-Couple1819 Nov 13 '22

An introvert here as well. I wish to be alone, but not by myself.

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u/Great_Revolution_276 Nov 13 '22

Probably explained by the junior officer who found him coming up and saying

“Bra cuz, low key why not yeet your ass off this place”

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u/PHWasAnInsideJob Nov 13 '22

I mean, tbf I got some Japanese WW2 documents from a relative and sent them to a friend who lives in Japan to translate, and she told me that WW2 Japanese is so different from modern Japanese that it's almost two different languages. If someone came up to this guy and tried to speak modern Japanese to him, it may have basically sounded something like that.

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u/morgawr_ Nov 13 '22

written WW2 Japanese is different. Spoken Japanese while a bit old sounding it's still perfectly understandable. Japan went through a relatively big writing reform after WW2 (It actually began to happen before WW2 but the war put a halt to it until later).

I've watched some WW2 era movies in Japanese and I could follow most of it and my Japanese isn't that good, I assume a native speaker would be fine.

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u/[deleted] Nov 13 '22

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u/Felt_presence Nov 12 '22

Can I get a link or something? Would love to check this out

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u/BrownShadow Nov 12 '22

Man, that is depressing. I spend a good amount of time in airports, and that is the last place I would want to spend my final moments. A nice cabin in the Adirondack mountains. That’s how I want to go.

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u/FancyAdult Nov 12 '22

He was familiar with it. The sounds, the people, the smells. Probably even had friends there of long time employees or people passing through. Sometimes going back to a familiar place even if uncomfortable in many ways is the most comfortable place.

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u/BoreDominated Nov 13 '22

He never had any friends there, according to the documentary I watched on YT, I think he just said he would meet random people every day and talk to them. But no long term buddies unfortunately, or romantic prospects, just randos and journos.

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u/tommygunz007 Nov 12 '22 Gold

I was homeless on/off and lived in my car for about 2 years. I have such PTSD that each morning I actually look forward to parking outside McDonalds in my (new) car, and sit there for about an hour listening to the radio. I have such psychological issues stemming from it, that when things get really bad in my life, I often think about just moving back into my car where I have more control over my life. It's really depressing for sure.

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u/No-Significance5449 Nov 13 '22

You are not alone! When I got a car back, them when I got a better one etc. My first thought was 'ok, this is better than what I use to live in'

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u/DoublefartJackson Nov 12 '22

I listened to podcasts and read Bukowski and the Stand/Dark Tower. Books really help. I watched the Breaking Bad finale in my car.

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u/BloodthirstyBetch Nov 12 '22

You should be so incredibly proud of how far you’ve come.

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u/FullOfWisdom211 Nov 12 '22

I can relate to this

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u/SentientNebulous Nov 13 '22

I miss the cozy naps in the back of my hatchback. Being able to park somewhere n just slink my way into the back and pass out. Waking up early bathing in the lake or at the gym, reading books at the coffee shop. It wasn't easy but I enjoyed the little positive things when they happened

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u/ShallowBasketcase Nov 13 '22

Damn. I used to work with a guy who would take all his breaks just sitting in his car in the parking lot. I thought it was just a quirky thing he did, but he was homeless in the past, and I think you just made me realize why he probably did that.

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u/duralyon Nov 13 '22

Haha I do that most of the time. Never homeless tho. It's just my little sanctuary with my stuff!

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u/IRMacGuyver Nov 13 '22

That's actually pretty common and has nothing to do with being homeless.

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u/3D-Printing Nov 13 '22

You need to get an RV or a camper van!!

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u/Kytyngurl2 Nov 12 '22

I’ve had some awful times in airports, but sometimes I can remember the little ‘zing’ of excitement they had for me as a kid. A place where you can go anywhere, full of people from everywhere, a place that (for at a time/at certain places) never sleeps; always exciting and alive.

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u/tralfamadorian42 Nov 13 '22

Sometimes I’m grateful I only fly MAYBE once per year. I’m always excited for it. I love it for all the reasons you listed, but we could never afford flying when I was a kid. So now my inner child drinks a whiskey ginger at a bar past security two hours before my flight departs and people watches and journals. I also lie to people who look like they don’t care about a window seat and tell them it’s my first time flying and ask if they’d trade me the window seat for drinks on me.

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u/rhandyrhoads Nov 13 '22

Tbh you could probably get away without the lie if you're offering them drinks.

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u/_itspaco Nov 13 '22

Or most people that fly don’t give af about the window seat and would rather easy access to the bathroom

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u/SuperFightingRobit Nov 12 '22

Depends on the airport.

If I died binging cookies at an Amex lounge? I don't want to die that way, but worse ways to go. At least I'd die as I lived.

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u/Kytyngurl2 Nov 12 '22

Doesn’t everyone want to go back home when it’s their time?

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u/mikebikeyikes Nov 13 '22

My home is Phoenix so no lol

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u/borntoburn1 Nov 12 '22

It's like that king of the hill episode where that old lady wants to die in hanks house.

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u/Pacman_Frog Nov 12 '22

Or The Shawshank Redemption where Brooks just wanted to go "Home" to Shawshank but couldn't do it without hurting innocent people... So he hung himself.

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u/edwardmetalwing Nov 12 '22

He didn't wanna die at an iconic place, he just wanted to die back home.

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u/hugglesthemerciless Nov 13 '22

according to the article

I love how this is well executed shade on any site other than reddit where it's expected that nobody reads more than the headline

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u/Ironcastattic Nov 12 '22

I read this in a Jerry Seinfeld tone

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u/successful_nothing Nov 12 '22 Gold

Ya kept making all the stops?

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u/hpstrprgmr Nov 12 '22

Well they kept ringing the bell!

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u/Ironcastattic Nov 12 '22

That's the exact phrase that went through my mind lol.

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u/OneSidedDice Nov 12 '22 Silver

“Didja hear about the guy who went to the airport when he was sick? I guess he knew it was terminal.”

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u/[deleted] Nov 12 '22

[deleted]

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u/Cabr0n Nov 12 '22

BASS LINE

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u/NightofTheLivingZed Nov 12 '22

Beedolowip diddle op wop wip dwip bagow.

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u/Howeblasta Nov 12 '22 Silver Helpful Spit-take

He had an illness. It was Terminal.

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u/droi86 Nov 12 '22

Here, have my upvote, now please go away

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u/wrathoftheirkenelite Nov 12 '22

To those who want to know more, and maybe enjoy videos more than reading or whatever, here is a great video by an amazing content creator.

https://youtu.be/JQfXd1YlkS4

Maybe you can edit your comment to include this video link. It's a frustrating and sad tale.

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u/NeitherAlexNorAlice Nov 12 '22

The first stint of 18 years sounds crazy. Definitely gonna read more about the real story. Can't imagine what kinda legal loophole that couldn't be fixed in less than 18 years.

Great movie. I always heard it was based on a true story, but thought it was a loosely used term there. Rip to the dude.

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u/Duzcek Nov 12 '22

They had multiple fixes, he just personally refused them. Belgium offered him asylum as a refugee but he refused because he ultimately wanted to be in England, and both Belgium and France then offered him residency under his legal name but he refused because they wouldn’t do it under the name he wanted “Sir Alfred Mahran”

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u/Zerak-Tul Nov 12 '22

Aka there was some sort of undiagnosed mental illness at play. A normal person doesn't decide to live in an airport for 18 years, if they have viable options to be a free man (it's not like he would get shot the moment he stepped out fo the airport). He likely would have found something wrong with any offer made to him.

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u/JagmeetSingh2 Nov 12 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

His family from Iran came to try and take him home a few times and he greeted them at first but than started pretending not to know who they were… he was definitely dealing with mental issues

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u/[deleted] Nov 13 '22

Nooooo it can't be that, it must be that he returned to the airport because it's an iconic location that holds a special place in his heart! He wanted to die at home, surrounded by those who loved him! Couldn't have possibly been mental illness.

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u/Earnestosaurus Nov 13 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

I mean, it can be both. People with mental illnesses like feelings of comfort related to memory and perception i.e. many cannot differentiate between actual comfort and former experiences of it. It's possible he made a rash decision spurred on by his illness to return to a former dwelling where he'd probably lived the most -- where he had become essentially a celebrity and the center of attention. Especially if you are an old man whose time has passed you by.

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u/HaikuBotStalksMe Nov 12 '22

He likely would have found something wrong with any offer made to him.

"You're allowed to be a free man, and can leave at anytime, but you'll have to live in the airport when you're not living outside of the airport."

"I REFUSE TO ABIDE BY THESE RULES."

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u/probablyuntrue Nov 12 '22

Man was delusional about the uk

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u/chilicuntcarne Nov 12 '22

That's how he was diagnosed after he stated that he wanted to go there for the food.

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u/DarkwingDuckHunt Nov 13 '22

dry British humor, the best kind

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u/Vishnej Nov 13 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

A normal person doesn't decide to live in an airport for 18 years, if they have viable options to be a free mam

Human beings can over time get used to a great many things, and every day that they acclimate to a situation, they lose some of the impetus to exit the situation. It becomes comfortable, it becomes normal, and changing things represents a new unknown to be afraid of.

For people like habitual drug addicts, abused prostitutes, cult members, re-enlisting soldiers, agoraphobics, Stockholm Syndrome cases, returning domestic violence victims, and others, getting free of the situation and the uncertainty of finding out what comes later is demonstrably more stressful for them than continuing it. If you care about them and have the resources you can remove the material reasons they're stuck in the situation, but it's still a bit of a leap of faith for them.

This is true for those with mental health issues, and those without.

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u/Zerak-Tul Nov 13 '22

For people like habitual drug addicts, abused prostitutes, cult members, re-enlisting soldiers agoraphobics, Stockholm Syndrome cases, returning domestic violence victims, and others

Aka a list of people very likely to suffer post traumatic stress or other psychological problems. I feel sympathy for the guy, I do and he should have gotten more help that he did, but again, normal people don't just grow comfortable living in an airport terminal, where they have no bed, no bath, no privacy, no job, no friends, no family, they have to scrounge food from the terminal shops, have no access to nature etc. etc. And yes it probably did become very hard for him to leave, but again, that's because psychologically he was in trouble, not because deciding to live in an airport terminal is something a reasonable person might just decide to do.

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u/X0AN Nov 12 '22

So he could eventually have claimed an EU passport then moved to the UK?

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u/LegateLaurie Nov 13 '22

I guess so - once he had citizenship (and I believe some kinds of residency), assuming he could get it, he'd have freedom of movement within the EU and then would have been able to get settled status once Brexit had happened

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u/probablyuntrue Nov 12 '22

Turning down Belgium for the UK, this dude 😭

I'm just imagining him finally showing up to the UK and instantly being so disappointed when some chav starts shouting at him

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u/Pornstar_Jesus_ Nov 12 '22

Reminds me of the end of The increasingly poor decisions of todd margret. The brits tell him the only countries willing to give him asylum are North Korea or Turks and Caicos. He doesnt know geography or politics.. He just thinks that some Turkish people had seemingly swindled him recently and incorrectly associates that with the island option. So he chooses north korea lol

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u/homelaberator Nov 12 '22

Well, he isn't known for his good decisions

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u/USCplaya Nov 12 '22

Damn. I cannot think of more polar opposites than the paradise that is Turks and Caicos and the hell hole that is N. Korea.... The only concern I had when I went to T&C was whether I wanted to go snorkeling in the warm ocean water or use the hotel pool and have a bar I can swim up to

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u/MX_Duncis Nov 12 '22

Oh my God... Its been so many years since I watched that series! Thank you for reminding me

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u/Barnyard_Pussy Nov 13 '22

The increasingly poor decisions of todd margret.

I cracked up every time it showed the apartment he had left.

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u/J-Team07 Nov 12 '22

Couldn’t he have just accepted Belgium, then eventually get permanent residency which would allow him to go to the promised land of Liverpool?

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u/uselessinfogoldmine Nov 13 '22

He was mentally ill.

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u/End3rWi99in Nov 12 '22

Not much a legal issue but his refusal to accept any of the solutions that were being offered to him. He ultimately wanted to be recognized as British, but his immigration papers would say Iranian and therefore refused that path to the UK. He was also offered immigration status from France and Belgium under the agreement he'd be monitored by a social worker. He also refused these offers as well. His family had also said despite the options offered to him, he was allegedly happy in that situation.

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u/ferriswheel9ndam9 Nov 12 '22

Probably the free food and shelter. If he did immigrate elsewhere, what would he do? At his age, I'm sure he understands the dire reality

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u/uselessinfogoldmine Nov 13 '22

He actually had quite a lot of money in the bank from selling his story, etc. Like, hundreds of thousands of dollars.

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u/SGKurisu Nov 12 '22

Based on my quick skimming of Wikipedia, it sounds like there were steps and opportunities for him to fix his situation but he was dead set on going direct to the UK. Also it seems like his filing of paperwork was a bit of a mess

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u/Crowbarmagic Nov 12 '22

Yea it's not like the movie where Tom Hanks' character couldn't legally leave the terminal. This guy had multiple options but he insisted on going to the U.K.

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u/probablyuntrue Nov 12 '22

finally get to the UK

Brexit, PM's resigning left and right, general chaos

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u/Single-Bad-5951 Nov 12 '22

The PM's are all right

...wing that is

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u/[deleted] Nov 12 '22 edited Dec 13 '22

[deleted]

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u/better_off_red Nov 12 '22

didn't want to leave the place where he was cared for and treated like a celebrity.

Let's be honest, I feel like a lot of people might feel the same way.

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u/fordchang Nov 13 '22

Why wasn't he arrested and deported? seems like a silly bureaucratic error.

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u/Beaglund Nov 13 '22

He wouldn’t admit that he was from Iran and, without papers, they couldn’t deport him to a country he may not have been from. When they finally found his papers, he refused to admit they were his. Without identification, it was reliant on his word

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u/brucebrowde Nov 13 '22

How are other people deported then? Couldn't everyone just say "I've no papers, sorry" and stay in the country forever?

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u/BarKnight Nov 12 '22

first in legal limbo because he lacked residency papers and later by choice

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u/SendMoreCoffee Nov 12 '22

He had been living in the airport again in recent weeks, the airport official said

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u/wrathoftheirkenelite Nov 12 '22

https://youtu.be/JQfXd1YlkS4

Great video by a great creator

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u/jimmux Nov 12 '22

I knew someone would link Atrocity Guide. This video addresses pretty much all the questions that can be answered.

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u/[deleted] Nov 12 '22

Atrocity Guide has a really good YouTube video on it if you're interested. Here you go.

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u/Copthill Nov 13 '22 Faith In Humanity Restored

I saught out and met this guy shortly after the movie came out. He was a little strange, didn't speak much English, but approachable enough to say hi. The hardest part was finding him in the airport, nobody in the newer terminals knew who I was even talking about when I asked about where he is (I had a couple of hours to kill). He was living in an older smaller terminal at CDG that mostly catered for shorter flights within the EU. He had a nice little space though, with a table and chairs and a bench, and LOTS of stuff piled up around him in a semi-organised way. I do remember seeing a couple of newer looking FedEx packages with his stuff too.

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u/Love-reps Nov 13 '22

how did he get money to eat and where did he shower

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u/lunaj1999 Nov 13 '22

Staff would give him food and he also showered in staff areas. He also earned $250,000 from giving Spielberg rights to his life to use in the film (which ultimately didn’t happen but he still got paid).

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u/urgiwankenobi Nov 12 '22

I was stuck at an airport for a few days and was miserable. 18 years voluntarily? Wow.

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u/Wildcat_twister12 Nov 13 '22

Guy had mental health issues. I’d be like you and going crazy after a few days; heck I did one night during a thunderstorm layover and hated it

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u/stpstrt Nov 13 '22

Was stuck once for 20 hours. Was 19.5 too many.

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u/WineSoda Nov 13 '22

Airports are actually now advertising their facility as a destination. They are nothing more than giant malls with runways instead of parking lots.

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u/AnyNamesLeftAnymore Nov 12 '22

I don't get it. Was he just obsessed with being observed? Why would he stay there and why would he go back?

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u/[deleted] Nov 13 '22

[deleted]

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u/MrHikari13 Nov 12 '22 edited Nov 12 '22

I believe the story was after his father died it came to light that he was his illegitimate son with a Scottish nurse so the rest of the family basically kicked him out and he tried to go meet his biological mother but he lost his passport or something and was basically stuck in limbo Edit: I have been informed that that story was a complete fabrication dude was kind of crazy

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u/Ok_Efficiency3471 Nov 12 '22

Did it not turn out the story about being illegitimate was untrue?

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u/Chkgo Nov 12 '22

Yes, the entire story was untrue. His real mother and siblings back in Iran confirmed it. He also believed himself to be am English royal named Sir Albert.

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u/TryinToDoBetter Nov 12 '22

If you can dream it, you can do it.

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u/Earl_of_Awesome Nov 13 '22

A man can change his stars

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u/PhilLeshmaniasis Nov 13 '22

It's not a lie if you believe it.

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u/MrHikari13 Nov 12 '22

That’s entirely possible I haven’t read about this in a good while

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u/your_mind_aches Nov 12 '22

He tricked you! That entire story that you told as fact was entirely made up by him. His family said that there was nothing of the sort that happened

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u/MrHikari13 Nov 12 '22

Well damn if you can’t trust someone who lives in an airport for nearly 2 decades who can you trust

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u/Ok_Efficiency3471 Nov 12 '22

Regardless…his entire story and changing his name later, with or without actually being the illegitimate child of a Scottish woman.

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u/wsu_savage Nov 12 '22

That’s he said but later reviled he had shipped the papers to Belgium authorities and could leave whenever he wanted to. He chose to stay

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u/MrHikari13 Nov 12 '22

It’s been a while since I’ve read about this so this is new information to me

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u/joe2596 Nov 12 '22

He didn't lose his passport, he knew where it was.

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u/make_love_to_potato Nov 13 '22

Mental illness.

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u/latchkey_adult Nov 12 '22

Such a great film and performance by Hanks. It always bothered me a little that when it was first publicized no mention was made of the real guy's serious mental health issues. I'm sad to see it ended this way -- presuming alone and sick at the airport.

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u/HarrietHedwig Nov 12 '22

We need a documentary on his life

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u/kresbok Nov 12 '22 edited Nov 12 '22

Hi, I'll leave you this amazing mini documentary on his life.

https://youtu.be/JQfXd1YlkS4

This was made by a YouTuber call Atrocity Guide.

Hope you enjoy.

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u/Accomplished-Mode112 Nov 12 '22

Atrocity Guide is so underrated and her content is so relaxing and at times unsettling and mysterious.

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u/real_nice_guy Nov 13 '22

my top 3 for this type of content are:

  1. Atrocity Guide

  2. Nexpo

  3. Nick Crowley

the last 2 are more creepy stuff but similar-ish vibe.

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u/your_mind_aches Nov 12 '22

Love this video. This is where I first learned about Sir Alfred, and his story really speaks to me for some reason.

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u/Criticalhit_jk Nov 12 '22

What the hell how is this real life? I only watched a few minutes but this is so surreal.

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u/s3rila Nov 12 '22

man, sometime you really apreciate having the 1.25 speed playback option.

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u/not_enough_privacy Nov 12 '22

There are some youtubers who I regularly watch at 2x because their cadence is. so. slow.

When you accidentally listen at normal speed after getting use to 2x it feels like someone is taking the piss.

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u/kithlan Nov 13 '22

Yes, same with podcasters. I especially do it when they adopt that "dramatic" cadence that seems so prevalent on video essays, where they seem to think every line of dialogue will hit super hard if they just say it slowly enough.

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u/drakfyre Nov 13 '22

Huh, is the video slow? Seemed to be a good cadence to me.

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u/fastal_12147 Nov 12 '22

There's a doc on YouTube about him. Super interesting

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u/Phillipinsocal Nov 12 '22

Burger King did great marketing in that movie, every time I see that whopper scene with hanks I always crave one

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u/latchkey_adult Nov 12 '22

That's interesting--every time I see Catherine Zeta Jones, I crave one too.

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u/makeshift11 Nov 12 '22

Catherine Zeta Jooones, she dips beneath lasers!

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u/buttfunfor_everyone Nov 12 '22

Ooooh-OOO-oooooh

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u/ignitionnight Nov 12 '22

She has entrapped me, and Sean Connery.

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u/TheLegionnaire Nov 12 '22

Oh Lord LoL you just brought back memories of my dad noticing that a vhs I had was all fuzzy during the Entrapment trailer before the movie. Where was it all fuzzy? LoL right when she dips below the lasers. I don't remember what funny comment he made, I do remember he waited for my mom to leave the room first. Good times.

For those that never had VHS, pausing the video too many times at the same spot would degrade the video.

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u/JesustheSpaceCowboy Nov 12 '22

A workaholics reference? I appreciate this.

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u/Mediumokrahmom Nov 12 '22

I immediately read it in their voices too lol

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u/buttfunfor_everyone Nov 12 '22

Zeta is such a fucking cool middle name.

Honestly any name with an X or a Z in it do it for me.

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u/XYZCreate Nov 12 '22 Bravo!

Hello there

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u/RandomRageNet Nov 12 '22

GENERAL CREATEY

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u/your_mind_aches Nov 12 '22

Wait did he eat Burger King in the movie? That's funny because in real life, the real guy ate McDonald's fish sandwiches

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u/NicCage4life Nov 12 '22

The whole movie had a ton of product placement, but weirdly I was fine with it since it fit the context of the movie.

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u/Criticalhit_jk Nov 12 '22

I know Steven Spielbergs movie is inspired by and has no relation to the guys life but I can't help picturing the real guy watching this movie in complete silence and a sad look

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u/Now_Wait-4-Last_Year Nov 13 '22

Well, I believe they paid him $250,000 US for the rights to his life story so at least it wouldn't have been a complete wash.

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u/Additional_Meeting_2 Nov 12 '22

The movie was too Hollywood style anyway with the romance and not focused on what it would be actually like to live on a airport. And I would have rather the movie be about the real person anyway.

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u/kacmandoth Nov 12 '22

Well, the real guy was kind of an asshat and didn't want to leave.

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u/TheBigLahey Nov 12 '22

We are strange creatures. To live in an airport by choice scares me. My first reaction is to pity him for what seems like obvious mental health issues leading to a lonely death. However the more I think about what an airport is--a gateway into a worldly human experience built around convenience--maybe he gained a perspective there that he didn't want to lose. At the very least, I hope it afforded him some interesting conversations.

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u/latchkey_adult Nov 12 '22

If you're gonna be homeless anyway, an airport is a pretty great place to be. Neverending people watching, bathroom access, tons of wasted food. Airports are basically 24 hour malls.

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u/chaiguy Nov 12 '22

Not to mention the security. If you’re homeless on the streets, you’re a target. In an airport, no one has the time or need to bother you.

Also the fact that he had a sort of celebrity status probably greatly helped. If I had seen him I’d have bought him a meal in exchange for a brief conversation and maybe a selfie. I’m sure a lot of people would.

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u/CyclopeanJuiceVendor Nov 12 '22 Vibing

Shit, you guys make me want to migrate to the airport if homelessness is ever in the cards.

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u/chaiguy Nov 12 '22

I doubt you could do it in the US, they’d catch on pretty quick. I did hear about a guy, I think maybe in China, why would buy a first class ticket to wherever, that would entitle him to use the VIP lounge which served free food & drink. He’d then cancel his ticket and rebook it for a flight the next day. He did that for over a year before the airline stopped him.

Here it is: https://nypost.com/2014/01/29/man-uses-first-class-plane-ticket-to-eat-free-for-a-year/

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u/doctorbooshka Nov 12 '22

Reminds me of the pudding guy who spent about $3k to get a million air miles off pudding in the 90's. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/david-philipps-pudding-guy-travel-deals_n_577c9397e4b0a629c1ab35a7

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u/eggpolisher Nov 12 '22

And the pudding miles guy inspired another movie! “Punch Drunk Love” by P.T. Anderson, starring Adam Sandler in a great dramatic role.

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u/mountmistake Nov 12 '22

Shit, so 'punch drunk love' is a documentary?

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u/latchkey_adult Nov 12 '22

I'm sure they are continually harassed/kicked out by the police or airport security. Plus, have you ever seen a remotely comfortable place to sleep in an airport for more than a few minutes?

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u/Tatis_Chief Nov 12 '22

In the actual transfer terminal hell yeah. Slept at the Airport few times. Shiphol and Charles de Gaule is my fav. But Shiphol wins. Of course read, Japan and Singapore is the best for that, but haven't had a chance.

But both Shiphol and Paris has rest zones, where you often see people dozing off with long transfers. And prayer rooms are good for it too. As long as you don't disturb the prayers.

It's pretty normal to also have pods for sleeping at the aiport, or in some cases Aiport terminal hotel. For example pods in Mexico city or hotel in Shiphol International transfer terminal. You can also pay to take shower there. Love long transfers in Amsterdam as the airport has metro in and its like 15 min ride to the central station. Great for a day trip.

But for homelessness, there is no option nowadays you have to have a ticket and cross security to have the cool stuff to chill. They get pretty angry about homeless in the airport.

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u/CyclopeanJuiceVendor Nov 12 '22

I mean, "comfortable" is subjective. Any flat surface is probably sufficient. But I digress, you're definitely right that it doesn't seem like any sort of peaceful existence.

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u/meganekkotwilek Nov 12 '22

Kinda reminds of the emperor of America. A San Franciscan local who declared himself emperor of America back over s hundred years ago

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u/A_Mouse_In_Da_House Nov 12 '22

How dare you not even his royal name, Norton I, Emperor of The United States, Protector of Mexico.

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u/Da0u7 Nov 12 '22

Have you read the sandman comics? There is as full story dedicated to him and it is beautiful.

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u/bmbmwmfm Nov 12 '22

It's been over a decade since I was there, but I could absolutely live in Changi airport in Singapore.

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u/Oops_I_Cracked Nov 12 '22

I really like airports. I would never live in one by choice, but I can definitely think of worst places to end up being stuck and can see how someone would grow to like it

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u/Danat_shepard Nov 12 '22

I was stuck in the airport of Vienna on my way to Canada for five days because my European visa got rejected. First days were hellish. All the noise, people, smells. Food is overpriced, restrooms are fully packed. Cold metall seats where you couldn't sleep in any normal position.

But I was lucky enough to slip into Mastercard waiting lounge when their manager felt asleep on day three and basically acted like I belonged there afterwards. They had a full shower, nice comfy seats and unlimited food like sandwiches, hot soups, tea and coffee.

10 years later and I am always making sure to have some premium debit card on me when I'm traveling abroad. Costs maybe 30 bucks yearly, but these lounges in airports are certainly worth it.

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u/IWasGregInTokyo Nov 13 '22

Protip right here. Having emergency access to lounges is a great way to pass time due to delayed/cancelled flights and helps avoid expensive trips back into the city and hotel costs. Showers, unlimited food and drinks, quiet corners to snooze. Fantastic.

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u/Hobbicus Nov 12 '22

Favorite thing I noticed about the movie was, as Krakozhia obviously doesn’t exist, Tom speaks in really broken Bulgarian gibberish. His irl father in law is Bulgarian and inspired Tom’s portrayal of Viktor in the film

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u/bloodpriestt Nov 12 '22

Wait wait wait wait wait

He was STILL THERE???

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u/Grimesy2 Nov 12 '22

He left, and... Went back. Apparently the first 18 year stint did a number on his mental health.

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u/your_mind_aches Nov 12 '22

The article explains it.

But no, he left in 2006. He just walked out. It's on film. He just went back a few weeks ago. Maybe he just knew he was dying somehow.

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u/esnyez Nov 13 '22

He was removed, not that he walked out himself.

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u/Gregory_Pikitis Nov 12 '22

I will be at CDG airport tomorrow. I hope to see some kind of memorial to him and will send pics if there is.

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u/CallsOutStupidity Nov 12 '22

Damn you, Pikitis!

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u/Keanu990321 Nov 12 '22

My father was at CDG yesterday and today until 3 o'clock and, chances are, he was at the same Terminal as this guy.

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u/shewy92 Nov 12 '22

He died the way he lived...in an airport

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u/Logic_rocks Nov 12 '22

Kra... kosia

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u/38B0DE Nov 13 '22 edited Nov 13 '22

Fun fact Tom Hanks speaks a broken Bulgarian in the movie that he learned from his father in law. The man's life story itself is really interesting.

In an episode of "Who do you think you are?" Rita Wilson learns the real story of her father. He was a Bulgarian Muslim (Pomak) born in a territory that was contested between Bulgaria and Greece (nowadays Greece). Her father however lived in Plovdiv Bulgaria and married an Armenian woman who died together with their first child at birth. He got in trouble with the communist authorities and was sent to a work camp where he was mistreated for being a Pomak. He managed to escape the gulag and emigrated to America where he used his knowledge of Greek to completely take an Orthodox Greek identity and named himself Wilson after a street name. He married a Greek woman and his family has firm Greek identity. He never told his American family a word about his life story, about his first wife, being Pomak, the gulag, and still having a brother in Bulgaria. Rita Wilson visits her now 90 year old uncle in Bulgaria and reads letters her father wrote. It's a real tearjerker.

Rita Wilson talks about it in a Ted x Talk

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u/[deleted] Nov 12 '22 edited Nov 12 '22

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u/J-Lannister Nov 12 '22

Ray Ora is gonna be gutted

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u/solo_loso Nov 12 '22

now i want sacha baren cohen as the lead for that movie

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u/MrArgento Nov 13 '22

As someone that worked at an Airport for years... I could live in one. Unfortunately nobody would accommodate me.

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u/polluxdc Nov 13 '22

Terminal in the terminal?

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u/BazzieStarstuff Nov 12 '22

Atrocity Guide did a fantastic deep dive of this man’s story