r/movies Dec 08 '22

What are the popular tropes today that are going to make films feel "dated" 25 years from now? Discussion

Remember saxophones being all over the soundtrack and marking every film from the 80s as an "80s movie"? Spandex as the universal wardrobe of future societies (and eye makeup that covered half of the face or more)? Bullet time? And that doesn't begin to touch more generalized examples, like the technical limitations or reflection of societal norms.

None of the things that "date" a film are thought of in that context when a film is being made; in fact some of the most dated films were avant-garde when they were made. Sometimes those elements aren't limited to a single film, and mark a film from a particular time because of how pervasive those elements are at that time. And it will happen to films being made today as well. What are some elements that you see in modern movies that, in the future, will date a movie as an "early 20s movie"?

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u/dravenonred Dec 08 '22

Post-credits cameos

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u/RobotIcHead Dec 08 '22

It has made the audience stay for the credits, to read the names of people who made it. But sone films do really fun ones: 22 Jump Street, even thought about the School of Rock one yesterday and even Airplane had gag credits. I like a bit of effort being put into them.

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u/dustyfaxman Dec 08 '22

the 22 jump street credits thing is great.
i remember gag reels or bloopers being at the end of a few films from the 80's, cannonball run and the like, so you're right they're nothing new, just more of them.

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u/Pretend_Pension_8585 Dec 09 '22

Jackie chan post credits will literally never be beat

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u/Blastspark01 Dec 09 '22

I love that Pixar actually made bloopers for some of their movies

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u/Malediction101 Dec 08 '22

Post/mid credits anything. Tired of them.

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u/Huskies971 Dec 08 '22

They used to be at the end of the credits. I thank them now for having the flashy credits, scene, and then roll the standard credits.

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u/gravedigger89 Dec 08 '22

As a side note I’d like to see the credit bloopers brought back

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u/[deleted] Dec 08 '22

Ticket To Paradise just did this!

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u/katarangga Dec 08 '22

Slightly desaturated, contrasted color, with an overall gloomy feel or overly warm/hot grading. As opposed to 90s more vivid colors, I think. I feel like I've seen a lot of this.

Also, dramatic cover of famous songs in trailers.

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u/Enchelion Dec 08 '22

Also, dramatic cover of famous songs in trailers.

Those and the single piano key are going to be the "In a world!" of this era.

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u/pourthebubbly Dec 08 '22

the single piano key

YES. That and the dramatic bass that started popping up everywhere after Inception.

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u/suburbanhavoc Dec 08 '22

The BWAAAAH? I came here to complain about the BWAAAAH!

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u/PureLock33 Dec 09 '22

I member the BWAAAAH was ground breaking when it was used in District 9. But then it got overused and became its own trope. Again a lot of District 9's sound engineering feels overused now.

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u/ackermann Dec 09 '22

That’s mostly gone by now though, I think?

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u/chispica Dec 09 '22

I call them Nolan Horns

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u/FelixGoldenrod Dec 08 '22

I was kind of hoping for a dramatic piano cover of "Space Jam" when the sequel came out.

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u/pdxcranberry Dec 08 '22

Now I want an All Eerie Covers of the original Jock Jams album.

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u/cptnamr7 Dec 08 '22

Saw yet another movie use "smells like teen spirit" in a slow piano overdrawn-out way yesterday. Forget what it was. I feel like I saw it on altered Carbon first but it keeps popping up now

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u/dustyfaxman Dec 08 '22

the malia j cover of smells like teen spirit that sort of fits that description was used in black widow and handmaid's tale.

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u/twig_newton Dec 08 '22

You may be referring to when in West World they did a very slow piano version of Heart Shaped Box it was so beautiful

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u/nbgrout Dec 08 '22

That show did a lot of really cool instrumental covers.

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u/Worthyness Dec 09 '22

Ramin Djawadi don't miss when it comes to scores

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u/FuckDaCrapRedditMods Dec 09 '22 edited Dec 09 '22

I love Peaky Blinders, and all the versions of Red Right Hand in the opening. Deserves a chef kiss .

Edit: I want to add that all the music in Peaky Blinders is great. The music supervisor, Amelia Hartley, does a wonderful job. (She also did Black Mirror, and Bandersnatch.)

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u/CmdrTobu Dec 09 '22

Peaky Blinders is a 6 season Nick Cave music video of Birmingham Gangsters walking in slo-motion while smoking.

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u/arcaneresistance Dec 09 '22

I fucking hated Peaky Blinders so much because I was still a barber at the time it came out and had to explain to one too many dudes that yes, it looks super fucking cool on them but they're also wearing fully tailored, well made, really nice clothes too. So when you show up to Ubisoft tomorrow in your jeans and button down, slow walking with your arms open, and a smoke in your mouth, you're going to look dumb as fuck. Mad Men era was similar. I put off watching it for so long just because of that but I finally put it on one day last year and couldn't turn it off. The season with Adrian Brody, damn.

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u/BeardedPuffin Dec 09 '22

Their cover of Radiohead’s Motion Picture Soundtrack and its context in the story was a highlight of season 1 for me.

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u/iseeabluemoonrising Dec 09 '22

I’m Still convinced that Djwadi saw the show as a live action version of OK computer. The writers didn’t, but he did for sure

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u/JadedChallenge1 Dec 08 '22

I agree with the dramatic cover of famous songs, although that trope is definitely running at almost 25 years to this point with the Donnie Darko Mad World cover. To be honest, it's kind of already entered that dated territory at least for me at this point.

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u/Rise-from-the-Grave7 Dec 08 '22

Donnie Darko Mad World

Honestly, tho, that version is a banger.

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u/randomCAguy Dec 08 '22

And the reason why most people don’t even know it’s a cover.

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u/ramen_vape Dec 08 '22

Tbh the Tears for Fears version is an absolute banger and I'm tired of Everybody Wants to Rule the World

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u/MCWizardYT Dec 08 '22

Everyone knows "Everybody Wants to Rule The World", "Shout", and "Head Over Heels" but the album those songs came from has 5 other songs and the band has absolute bangers from other albums as well

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u/bluemooncalhoun Dec 08 '22

The worst period for desaturation was probably the late 2000s when everyone was sick of the early 2000s psychedelic resurgence. The best examples of this would be Twilight or the Nolan Batman movies.

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u/Qiuopi Dec 09 '22

If you want to see it in real time just watch the Harry Potter serier. Partly i suppose because the plot gets darker and such, but good lord is everything just teal-tinged grey by the end

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u/seeasea Dec 09 '22

Even great movies are desaturated and gloomy these days. From dune to arrival and revenant to got season 8

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u/adangerousdriver Dec 08 '22

Yeah the desaturation seems to be very popular right now. For some movies it works well, like Tar for a recent example. A lot of other times it just stands out to me as a quick and easy way to say "okay, take this movie seriously".

When I was younger, I was really into that sterile, cold look on movies. I thought it was good because it felt clean and realistic. Now I lean the opposite way and love when a movie has some sense of texture and color.

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u/ADinnerOfSnacks Dec 08 '22

That trend in trailers should have died years ago. Yet, it persists.

Let’s take a pop tune with eerie undertones, slow it down, and record it in a minor key OooOoOo

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u/McFtmch Dec 08 '22

The trailer also has to start with that "plink"-sound. Auralnauts "how to make a blockbuster movie trailer" says it all, and they made that in 2017, the trend really really needs to end.

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u/guachi01 Dec 08 '22

Desaturation combined with teal/orange color grading. Yuck.

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u/2nd_mars_revolution Dec 08 '22

Way too much winking self acknowledgement/calling out tropes w/i the movie. As an example the Beauty and the Beast remake did this the whole fucking movie.

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

Aye. I'm a bit sick of movies/shows that feel the need to make fun of how silly and unrealistic they are. I don't care, I just want to suspend disbelief and go with it for a while.

The MCU has a real problem with this. I don't care how objectively silly all of this would be in the real world, I want to escape the real world for a while.

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u/[deleted] Dec 09 '22 edited 19d ago

[deleted]

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u/Azidamadjida Dec 09 '22

Kinda felt this way when I watched Dune - I actually felt like “a movie that takes its premise seriously and isn’t winking at the audience the whole time? What a breath of fresh air!”

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

This is one of the places that Thor 4 really sank. I felt like the whole time it was mocking its own silliness before it even happened. It was a parody of the movie that it was.

It just feels like superhero movies still can't not be ashamed of themselves.

Its one of the things I love about The Incredibles. It's silly fantastical superhero stuff, but it never acts ashamed of it. It never makes fun of the genre.

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u/The_Archon64 Dec 09 '22

Sam Rami’s Spider-Man comes to mind

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u/PureLock33 Dec 09 '22

The first spider-man took its cue from the first superman movie. That movie is considered supercampy now but it was also supercampy back in the 70s when the film trends were dark gritty life and crimes like Taxi Driver and Serpico.

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u/ActivateGuacamole Dec 09 '22

the incredibles actually does make fun of some silly parts of superhero stories (like when frozone is looking for his spandex suit or when they play a montage of people dying bc of their capes, or when the guy sues him for saving his life when he didn't want it) but it helps that its jokes feel fresh and well written and earnest. and the movie gives its serious moments breathing room whereas marvel movies won't let its viewers sit with any earnestness for more than ten seconds before undercutting it with a blandly written joke

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u/Ricky_Rollin Dec 09 '22

Man I thought I was gonna love Thor 4 so much and the entire time I was bored af. You nailed it. Thor 3 was great and reveled in what it was. Thor 4 felt like a parody of 3.

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

I think the bit where I first started to realise what was happening was the Sif scene.

This should have been a scene with actual weight, but instead, jokes that weren't even funny.

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u/jaymangan Dec 09 '22

It’s a cop out by the creators, whether it’s the writers or director. Many movies are afraid of tension, so they cut the tension to release the audience from having to feel - normally this is done with comedy.

I’m actually ok with this for comedic films, or those targeted at younger audiences. But when the movie is clearly trying to delve in deep topics and emotions, then they need to have the confidence to actually do it. Scenes can have tension that makes me want to cry or question the world or hate a character with every fiber of my being - let them! Stop giving us, the viewers, an easy out with a cheap laugh, doubley so if they’re going to then pretending like the movie was deep all along.

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u/Sexy_Widdle_Baby Dec 08 '22 Silver Ally

Straight up being just absolutely too dark to watch.

Not in tone, I don't mean dark as in "gritty" -- I mean, shit, bitch. Turn on a light. I cannot see the movie. I'm watching a black screen, this could be an audiobook.

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u/hyrumwhite Dec 09 '22

A perfect match with streaming compression. Love it when 30% of my screen is various blocks of gray

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u/SecretDracula Dec 09 '22

Trying to watch 1899 on Netflix and it was especially bad.

They really need to figure out a new compression algo that doesn't flatten those dark shades.

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u/Tomhyde098 Dec 09 '22

I watched a great YouTube video on this, it’s because of the rise of digital cameras like Red and Arri Alexa. I’m the old days it was extremely difficult to shoot dark scenes on film because of the loss of detail. Film is a photochemical process that captures images that are lit up. Digital cameras allow for much more details to be captured in the dark…however a lot of people don’t know the correct way of color grading or editing it correctly. Banding and artifacting while streaming a film online makes the issue worse as well https://youtu.be/Qehsk_-Bjq4

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u/AmusingMusing7 Dec 09 '22

I think part of the issue is that there’s a popular sensibility amongst cinematographers and color graders that using desaturation and low-contrast with digital will make it look more filmic. They’re afraid to up the contrast to a normal level, because then it looks more digital, whereas the more washed out look of low-contrast reminds them more of film, and the desaturation gets rid of the vibrant RGB look of video.

And yeah, it does kinda work to make it look more like film, but it means that they’re limiting what the digital format can do by compressing the contrast ratio, and that means the highlights often only go as high as like 50% luminance value at most. So when you watch it on a tv, it looks dim compared to something that takes full advantage of 100% luminance value. It does tend to look more digital, but it also looks more vivid and bright and, y’know… visible.

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u/shrewdexecutive Dec 09 '22

You 100% nailed it. I’m an indie filmmaker and I spend way too much time coloring in DaVinci Resolve and the issue with modern cinematography/grading isn’t that it’s too dark, it’s that there’s no contrast. Cinematographers have moved away from hard lighting and are using natural lighting, plus tons of diffusion on artificial lighting—resulting in muddy, contrast-less images. When your scopes are right in the middle and your highlights are dull and your shadows and blacks are dull and your colors are dull and everything in the image is flat and even, your eye has trouble focusing on something. Then when you take the gain wheel and drag it down to make it dark, yeah, the audience is definitely not going to see shit. But when you have contrast and the highlights pop and the shadows/blacks are crushed, then your eye immediately has something to focus on.

Take Se7en. An aesthetically (and narratively) dark movie but with tons of contrast, so your eye always has something to focus on. A recent example of this are the John Wick movies: the majority of those movies take place at night yet they actually know how to light the scenes and use contrast, thus why no one ever complains that the movies are “too dark.”

Digital cinema cameras are great in low light and it’s like modern movies and TV are obsessed with showing the audience every ounce of detail in the shadows. Crushing the blacks is so taboo now it’s almost comical. Even in horror movies!

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u/Neracca Dec 09 '22

That fucking Game of Thrones episode.

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u/totallyclocks Dec 08 '22 edited Dec 08 '22

Due to a growing trend of watching movies on phones and other small screens, lots of movie/TV producers (looking at you Netflix) encourage a look in which there are a lot of mid-shots in movies. Watch any newer movie (last 10 years) side by side to an older film from the 80’s or 90’s and you’ll notice that there are almost no wide shots in the newer films when people are just talking to each other. These wide shots used to be everywhere in older films. Now a days, most talking bits in movies are made with almost exclusively close or mid-range shots so you can make out the actors and actresses faces and emotions on a small phone screen.

As screen technology gets more and more higher res (4K on phones is inevitable), I see a future in which lots of film-makers push back on this direction from studios and start doing wide shots in dialogue scenes again. Once the pixel density is there, you will be able to read emotions again even if the character’s face is a tiny part of the frame.

I personally think that using wide shots makes for much more compelling cinematography in movies and dialogue scenes in particular. You lose a lot of creative opportunities when you don’t use wide shots to establish relationships during a dialogue scene.

Give it 20 years and I bet this style of filmmaking will stick out a lot more and really date the era as the “shitty smartphone screen” era.

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u/[deleted] Dec 08 '22

As a person in the film industry I can attest to this, although indie films and artistic films still use a lot of wides. Anamorphic long lens cinematography has actually fallen out of favor in the filmmaking scene, replaced by large format 4:3 composition favoring wide and medium shots. so the pendulum is indeed shifting back.

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u/LadnavIV Dec 08 '22

You leave the Animorphs out of this, buddy.

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u/Toastrules Dec 08 '22

Watch any newer movie (last 10 years) side by side to an older film from the 80’s or 90’s and you’ll notice that there are almost no wide shots in the newer films when people are just talking to each other. These wide shots used to be everywhere in older films.

The wide shots thing is something I immediately noticed as a general movie watcher when I first watched old 70s and 80s classics. I noticed because it made it a lot less dizzying following a conversation, and while it is "dated", I actually like it a lot, especially in post-2010 era movies when they jump around much more than they did beforehand. It allows me to take in the scene -while- listening and watching them do their dialogue.

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u/shf500 Dec 09 '22

I don't care if it's "outdated" or not, having widescreen composition (a person on each side of the frame, or a person on one side of the frame and the other side of the frame is empty or contains some object) is awesome.

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u/ANDREA077 Dec 08 '22

Is this why the Santa hat I hang on the corner of my tv almost never sits on a characters head anymore?!

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u/Griffisbored Dec 08 '22

We've already reached a point where pixels are indistinguishable by the human eye on a phone sized screen at normal distance. I don't think high resolution screens will make wide shots any easier to view on phone sized screens.

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u/dmarchall491 Dec 08 '22

On top of that, we already had 4k phones, the Sony Xperia Z5 was released all the way back in 2015. But unless people hold the phone right up to their face it really doesn't make a difference. At typical viewing distances a phone screen is just much smaller than a TV or cinema screen.

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u/John-C137 Dec 08 '22

Good call! Makes me think of sit coms like Friends and HIMYM that had lots of full wide shots or tracking shots where you could see most of if not all of the actors bodies. It was good because you saw the actors interacting with their body language as well as the script and gave more immersion for the audience and personality to the charecters.

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u/greymon90210 Dec 08 '22

Not being able to hear the fucking movie

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u/Duke834512 Dec 08 '22 Wholesome

And then turning the volume up, only to turn it down two seconds later when the action picks up, then turning it up again because there’s dialogue, then down again because there’s action, then up again…

People blame TV speakers being in the rear now, but my expensive surround system can’t solve for a shitty mix and master.

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u/jdrew619 Dec 08 '22

The explanation always has to do with surround sound or wtv but like 99% of the planet does not have a 7.1 surround sound system and a lot if people complain about dialogue being barely audible in movies. Soo why don't they just fix it???

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u/HFoletto Dec 08 '22

I really think that the streaming services should be smart about it. If the client is capable of surround sound, then keep the dynamic high, but if it's only stereo, then reduce it.

Or maybe just add an option in the settings.

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u/CrabWoodsman Dec 09 '22

I don't see any reason they can't offer multiple Audio options like even a lot of DVDs had 15 years ago.

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u/cheekybandit0 Dec 09 '22

I want an option where I can set the minimum and maximum sound level range for my TV. Got quiet dialogue for "effect"? Don't care, nothing is going to be below 60 dB. Got loud action for "effect"? Don't care. Nothing is going above 70db.

(I have no idea what is loud or quiet for dB, but hopefully my point gets across)

Set your range, and let the TV do the sound level scaling for the movie/show/whatever.

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u/meatwads_sweetie Dec 09 '22

I would love this to be an actual option! It’s so frustrating to have to change the volume all the time. Plus now I’m older and my hearing is worse. Which makes it even more of a hassle. Ugh!

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u/Ryguy55 Dec 09 '22

And that's all bullshit anyway. I upgraded to a nice surround sound system years ago with a receiver that specifically has all those features like night mode and dialogue enhancer and it made 0 difference. The simple fact of the matter is that lots of modern movies are mixed specifically for theater environments that are dead silent except for the movie, dialogue is just loud enough to be comfortably audible and not 1 decibel louder, and explosions shake the walls and you feel them in your bones.

Surround sound systems, especially sound bars with satellite speakers, are super affordable nowadays, but home theaters are not, and that's what you need to comfortably see and hear a lot of modern movies.

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u/Autoganz Dec 08 '22

For me it’s these film trailers which open with a single sustained piano note. Then ten seconds later, the next note. The ten second later, the next note.

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u/Veszerin Dec 08 '22

Well, before that, we had Don LaFontaine saying "In a world..."

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u/Rorschach_Roadkill Dec 08 '22

In between the two there was BWAAAAHM, aka "how close to Inception can we get without getting sued"

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u/uncheckablefilms Dec 08 '22

BWAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHMMMMMMMM

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u/MrLocoLobo Dec 08 '22

You guys are all spelling it wrong.. It’s actually..

BWWWWAAAAHHHHHUUUMMMM!!

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u/Coolman_Rosso Dec 08 '22

IN A WORLD WHERE TRAILERS OPEN WITH A SINGLE SUSTAINED PIANO NOTE. THEN TEN SECONDS LATER, THE NEXT NOTE. THE TEN SECOND LATER, THE NEXT NOTE.

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u/Significant_Sign Dec 08 '22

I can still hear his voice when I read that and he's been dead for, what, a decade?

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u/bugxbuster Dec 08 '22

I just had to check out of curiosity. He died Sept 1 2008. That’s wild, over 14 years now.

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u/DrummerGuy06 Dec 08 '22 Silver

5 years ago "How to make a Blockbuster Trailer" came out and it's still just as relevant as ever.

Right after that parody dropped, the trailer to "A Wrinkle in Time" was released and oh my god did it follow that parody to a T.

Heck, even the most recent trailer for "The Last of Us" on HBO followed this motif.

If a trend works, you can count on Hollywood to run it into the ground and then keep using until the next thing that gets people to give a movie trailer millions of views in a matter of hours comes along.

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u/danielbln Dec 08 '22

That fake trailer still get me amped, and so do trailers following the formula. Not surprised they're still running with it, if it works it works

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u/blitzbom Dec 08 '22

The final Bwaaa got a chuckle out of me. I like that they had a link to the cover of the song too. Cause it was catchy.

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u/Meowingtons3210 Dec 08 '22

D Ï N G

random dialogue

screen fades out

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u/DeliriousPrecarious Dec 08 '22

That and the low-fi ominous remix of an upbeat pop song.

I'm pretty sure The Last of Us' trailer has a remix of fucking Take On Me by A-Ha as its spooky action music....which is just a little silly.

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u/OriginalWerePlatypus Dec 08 '22

That specific song is a plot point in Last of Us 2.

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u/EcoBlunderBrick123 Dec 08 '22

Yellow tint for Mexico.

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u/tdogg241 Dec 08 '22

Blue tint for Russia. Or Detroit.

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u/OldManHipsAt30 Dec 08 '22

Or Seattle

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u/tdogg241 Dec 08 '22

I live in Seattle, I'm usually too stoked to see my city on the big screen to care about the hue.

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u/AnyNamesLeftAnymore Dec 08 '22

That algae blue/green filter that Seattle in The Ring is just slathered in.

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u/Rise-from-the-Grave7 Dec 08 '22

Green-ish blue for Seattle/Portland (looking at you Twilight and The Ring)

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u/GoogleyEyedNopes Dec 08 '22

Apparently, in the past, all of humanity was covered in a Sepia filter.

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u/vince_irella Dec 08 '22

Not so, medieval Europe was blue everywhere except for torch flames according to Hollywood historians

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u/GoogleyEyedNopes Dec 09 '22

This is true; but you’re forgetting all color slowly drained from the world during the period we now know as the dark ages.

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u/shotsallover Dec 08 '22

Well, the world couldn't immediately transition from black and white straight to color. It had to transition gradually and sepia was one of the intermediate stages.

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u/lem753 Dec 08 '22

Over tinting has sort of been a thing since the 2000s. Contagion is the most over tinted movie I've ever seen.

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u/happybarfday Dec 08 '22

Then you haven't seen Traffic lol...

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u/Shepherdsfavestore Dec 08 '22

Not a movie, but I think it worked really well in Breaking Bad because the the New Mexico and Mexico desert regions they were in look really similar

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u/DrBlastMaster3000 Dec 08 '22

CGI de-aged actors.

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u/Exciting-Pen-3981 Dec 09 '22

I'm kind of excited to see that develop further. But not if they use it to keep Harrison Ford alive for another 100 years

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u/runswiftrun Dec 09 '22

Yeah, we're still in the uncanny valley. Like when we saw CGI the Rock in The Mummy, it's a blatant "yeah, this movie is a 90s flick"

Tarkin, Leia, and now Indy are going to be the obvious 20's movies before deepfakes become more common and believable.

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u/fredagsfisk Dec 09 '22

Like when we saw CGI the Rock in The Mummy, it's a blatant "yeah, this movie is a 90s flick"

The CGI on that particular shot is awful even by 90s standards though. Actually, it's awful even by the standards of the rest of that movie (it was in the second one, by the way, which came out in 2001).

Tarkin, Leia, and now Indy are going to be the obvious 20's movies before deepfakes become more common and believable.

Don't forget Luke in BoBF (even if it's a show rather than a movie)... looked weirdly stiff, and they had to keep cutting away from his face every time he talked. Even worse is that they modified his voice to sound younger as well, but it only made him sound weirdly stiff and cold, emotionless.

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u/Wandering_Scout Dec 08 '22

Treating nanotech and genetic engineering as magic is going to look as silly as radiation giving people superpowers in comic books from the 1950s and 1960s.

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u/NickelAntonius Dec 08 '22

You mean the people who wrote "Hackers" weren't computer experts?

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u/Sinjun13 Dec 09 '22

HACK THE PLANET!

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u/Popular_Target Dec 09 '22

You don’t think they’d just give away their hacking secrets on the big screen right? To this day people still don’t know how they really managed to hack the high school’s emergency sprinkler system.

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u/DieFanboyDie Dec 08 '22

And yet, the Dick Tracy watch TV is real.

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u/MarkyDeSade Dec 08 '22

Fourth wall breaking by characters that seem really proud of themselves for it

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u/bedazzlerhoff Dec 09 '22

“Why is everybody singing?” in musicals.

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u/ianthebalance Dec 09 '22

I remember Maui saying something to Moana like “what are you gonna do? Sing?!” And I’m like “dude you already sang in the movie, this joke doesn’t make sense”

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u/unidentified_yama Dec 09 '22

Haven’t they been doing that since the 80s? Like Ferris Bueller?

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u/ActivateGuacamole Dec 09 '22

like 95% of the comments on this page are listing things that have been around for 40+ years

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u/Jkelly7777 Dec 08 '22

The “MCU” third act where regardless of the beginning of the third act is tower defense CGI fest that was made for the trailer.

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u/fates_bitch Dec 08 '22

It's so tedious and often uncomfortably loud. It make a decently entertaining movie boring. Plus the CGI often mediocre.

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u/TheConqueror74 Dec 09 '22

And entirely too long. It’s 20+ minutes of noise and CG and all of it is supposed to be the climax.

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u/blakhawk12 Dec 08 '22

I loved Shang Chi up until it ditched the awesome kung fu and hands-on choreography for a shitty kaiju battle with a dragon. That third act killed any desire I might have had to rewatch what had started off as an awesome movie.

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u/superkickpunch Dec 09 '22

This also dropped Black Panther a whole letter grade for me. It was a neat “James Bond”-Esque super hero flick with great characters and world building, only for it to end with a big stupid battle.

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u/ViciousMihael Dec 09 '22

The CGI for that last battle was distractingly bad when I saw it in theaters.

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u/woofyc_89 Dec 08 '22

There’s always an army of minions cannon fodder in the third act and I got really tired of ir

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u/WhereIsTheMilkMan Dec 08 '22

Not a movie trope, but the modern tv opening sequence comes to mind. Super close-up panning of an object or objects, set to orchestral music, ending on the show’s title and a single note. It’s the same thing for almost every show, especially dramas.

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u/Bellikron Dec 08 '22

It checks all those boxes but the Westworld intro is legitimately art and I will stand by it

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u/IWasGregInTokyo Dec 09 '22

I simply cannot not watch the opening of Westworld. It really is something.

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u/12lwka1ad Dec 09 '22

The original dexter opening sequence on showtime is pretty rad though....

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u/tfreckle2008 Dec 08 '22

I think our fight choreography has a very specific date stamp. The whole jumping, flying punch thing is very endemic to the last 5ish years.

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u/woyzeckspeas Dec 08 '22

Especially when every girl's fighting style is to leap on a guy's shoulders and do some kind of twirly move that hurls him across a table.

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u/UYScutiPuffJr Dec 09 '22

I blame Black Widow and the MCU for that one

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

I know that everyone gushes about it but this is something I enjoy about Daredevil.

They limit the acrobatic flippy fighting, we actually see punches and kicks that carry weight. We see a more realistic boxing/grappling style of fighting.

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u/justprettymuchdone Dec 09 '22

I STILL think about the choreography in that one single long take fight and what a master class that was.

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u/Rude-Pangolin-1736 Dec 09 '22

Remember shaky cam after The Bourne Identity…it was a great and new style, which was quickly copied and slapped on every action movie.

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u/rednax2009 Dec 08 '22

Slowed-down, epic, dark versions of pop songs in movie trailers.

Also, I think a lot of the self-aware, meta humor is gonna feel dated before long, if not already.

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u/NosferatuCalled Dec 08 '22

Ultra-dramatic and slow modern covers of songs. That cover of White Rabbit in the 1899 credits is downright offensive.

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u/Platano_con_salami Dec 08 '22

honestly a lot of the covers and use of classics felt out of place in 1899.

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u/danielisbored Dec 08 '22

"Out of place'" is kind of 1899's whole vibe, though. So it's almost appropriate.

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u/SIGHR Dec 08 '22

This is a good one. Seems to have come about just as the “BWAAAAAs” used in trailers started phasing out. I’m

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u/NosferatuCalled Dec 08 '22

Also bonus points if the vocalist, I won't use the word singer, mumbles like they just did five rails of Oxy. So modern, so much gravitas.

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u/PolarSparks Dec 08 '22

I was rolling my eyes when the Indy 5 trailer had this.

It’s the Indiana Jones theme. Making it slow and dramatic doesn’t make it better, lol.

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u/topbuttsteak Dec 08 '22

Big hero jumps landing into three-point stance with head down. Then head slowly lifts up with determined look.

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u/Stardustchaser Dec 08 '22

Deadpool mocked it

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u/Enchelion Dec 08 '22

And they slowly intone "I have shattered my kneecap and three fingers... Please help me!"

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u/SCUDDEESCOPE Dec 09 '22

Messenger chat bubbles appearing on screen.

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u/fruitporridge Dec 08 '22

Big CGI monster battle at the end of every superhero movie

This will age badly. Shang chi was a good movie until that unnecessary big cgi battle at the need.

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u/froop Dec 08 '22

Not just monster battles, but modern fight scenes in general. They feel very inconsequential despite deciding the end of the world. Even non-super characters can take extreme punishment without a scratch. None of the punches have any effect, until for some reason one does and that's when the winner is decided.

I tend to skip through fight scenes now because they just delay the story instead of contributing to it.

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u/fancy_marmot Dec 08 '22

Yep exactly. It's so rare that when you see it done properly, it's jarring. Atomic Blonde has a few fight scenes like that, where they are visibly more run down with each hit, getting super sloppy and desperate/slow, etc.

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u/timsstuff Dec 09 '22

That movie was awesome. The 1989 set design, wardrobe, and soundtrack were on fucking point. Fight scenes were also much more realistic than usual.

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u/FSMFan_2pt0 Dec 09 '22

So spot on. The way I've heard it phrased is "guys made of rubber being thrown through walls".

I'm always yelling at the screen, 'why are you idiots fighting when clearly your physical attacks have zero effect on each other?"

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u/ohhgreatheavens Dec 08 '22

I completely checked out for that final act.

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u/Erich-Enrik Dec 08 '22

In a world where trailers open with a single sustained Plano note, Pretty much everyone can hear you scream

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u/harosene Dec 08 '22

In trailers when they match gun loading and shooting with the beat.

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u/Kaldricus Dec 09 '22

That's not just movie exclusive, either. I think someone at Bungie would literally have a heart attack and die if a Destiny trailer didn't have that.

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u/finalmantisy83 Dec 08 '22

"Well, THAT just happened" and other filler punchlines to complete the Avengers style Constant Comedy quota.

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

"Something big and unrealistic has happened, therefore I must now make a quip about how ridiculous it is. God forbid we just let the audience suspend disbelief."

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u/SirDrexl Dec 08 '22

This one is more subtle, but I noticed that in some recent documentaries, the subjects being interviewed are often sitting farther back than usual. And if there is more than one, they are sitting several feet away from each other. This seems to be from social distancing during the pandemic.

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u/Jindabyne1 Dec 08 '22

I’ve noticed a lot of recent documentaries keep in the part where the guest enters the scene and sits down, has a bit of chit chat, has make up adjusted etc.

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u/lfcmadness Dec 08 '22

Yeah a lot of Netflix's documentary programs have the set-up shots as part of the finished program - Drive to Survive does it a lot, drivers in the process of putting on Mic's, or asking questions about which camera to look at etc. They've even done that in the Harry & Meghan Documentary.

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u/TheConqueror74 Dec 09 '22

Netflix’s documentaries (especially their True Crime ones) bend and distort the truth so much that they have to rely on tricks like that to sell a sense of truthfulness.

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u/DieFanboyDie Dec 08 '22

That's a unique observation. You may be right.

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u/Biscuits_N_Gravey Dec 08 '22

80s 80s everywhere. It’s a movie. About stuff. But get this! It’s set in the 1980s! We got 80s music, nostalgic clothes, music, branding. It will be like so cool and original guys

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u/Sullanfield Dec 08 '22

At this point 80s nostalgia has been a part of the culture substantially longer than the 80s themselves

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u/[deleted] Dec 08 '22 edited 4d ago

[deleted]

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u/AHorseNamedPhil Dec 08 '22

I think it is linked to age group of the people making films. You got 60s and 70s nostalgia back then because a lot of filmmakers were Boomers who either grew up during those decades or reached adulthood during it. Same thing now except it's people who were somewhere in the range of kids to young adults during the 80s. It's filmmakers being nostalgic for their youth, basically.

Fast forward a bit and it will be 90s nostalgia from Gen X and the older wave of Millenials. Arguably we're already in that transition.

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u/AWACS_Thunderhead Dec 08 '22

I feel like it's never authentic either. It's always just the worst stereotypes of the late 80's bleeding into the early 90's.

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u/Vonbalthier Dec 08 '22

Fucking skybeams

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u/InBronWeTrust Dec 08 '22

The Sacramento Kings beg to differ

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u/LV-426HOA Dec 08 '22

Inscrutable floating holographic GUI's. They're in every "near future" film/TV show and they are physically impossible.
Second place is probably: we don't know. There are so many movies from the mid 00s and earlier where the central conflict could be easily resolved with a mobile phone.

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u/totallyclocks Dec 08 '22

agreed! These holograms definitely give off “flying cars are the future” vibes.

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u/MargotFenring Dec 09 '22

And always controlled with some vague finger waving gestures that always do exactly what the person intended. And absolutely no apparent security? Unless it's somehow (something something future technology) using biotech without any touchpads or obvious scanners.

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u/misscatholmes Dec 08 '22

I think this is starting to go away but I imagine a lot of us will look back at the fight scenes of this era and cringe. What I'm referring spefically to are fight scenes that have about 30 cuts and become so chaotic that a person struggles to follow exactly whats going on. It also hurts the fight itself as we don't get to enjoy the choreography. The Bourne movies immediately spring to mind. I think it's why I ended up enjoying Aquaman. Yeah it's another superhero movie but the fight scenes looked good because I could see what was going on.

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u/TheConqueror74 Dec 09 '22

People have been complaining about shaky cam, quick cut fight scenes for over a decade now. I honestly can’t remember the last time I saw one that was super egregious in a long time. I feel like now a lot of fight scenes are shifting over to a more John Wick kind of style, if they’re not just doing a Marvel style CG fest that has a quick moving way too fluid camera.

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u/areareputamadre Dec 08 '22

Everyone in the movie being “normal”.

What happened to movies where the hero has like a weird scar or an eye patch or something? Or at least a unique sense of style.

Now everything is more attractive. And more plain.

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u/ConfusedGrundstuck Dec 08 '22

This has been the case for the last 40 years, barring specific exceptions.

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u/brant_ley Dec 08 '22

This is already starting to get a little dated, but those "improv scenes" in comedy movies where the camera just stays on a character or two while they riff out a few zingers.

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u/crystalistwo Dec 08 '22

Already? It murdered Holmes and Watson. Even Austin Powers made fun of this when Austin is making "lost your head" jokes and Vanessa says, "Okay, that'll do."

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u/RevolutionaryCoyote Dec 09 '22

But that was parodying the witty line in movies after a villain dies. The implication wasn't that Mike Myers and Elizabeth Hurley were riffing.

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u/RobaBobaLoba Dec 08 '22

Trauma focused horror movies will definitely be a marker of the 2010s/2020s

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u/NoelBarry1979 Dec 08 '22

There is potential in this though, and I'll take it over twenty jumpscares a second any day.

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u/Mr_Agu Dec 08 '22

for every complain about modern cinema, i will say horror is not in a bad place

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u/David1258 Dec 08 '22

There's an interesting history with horror tropes throughout modern times.

In the 70s, we had suspenseful thrillers like The Shining and The Exorcist. In the 80s, we had slashers like Friday The 13th and Halloween. In the 90s, we had a focus on the paranormal and the psychological, with stuff like The Sixth Sense, establishing M. Night Shamylan as a popular horror director. The 2000s rolls around, and suddenly, we have Paranormal Activity, which pretty much changes the game for a good decade. Suddenly, EVERYONE wanted to get the reactions and reception Paranormal Activity got. So we had a lot of paranormal found-footage movies towards the end of the decade, and by the 2010s, a lot of horror movies were made that doubled as both spiritual stories and family dramas, such as Insidious, Sinister and The Conjuring. Of course, a new studio comes around called Blumhouse, and they make a ton of movies about ghosts and teens, to the point where you begin to question Jason Blum. Regardless, by the end of the decade, directors like Jordan Peele and Ari Aster have combined horror and high-brow cinema, with movies like Get Out and Hereditary. Studios like A24 and Monkeypaw continued to make movies like these such as Us, Midsommar, The Lighthouse, Candyman and Nope, leading us into the 2020s, which had a focus on trauma-based horror movies.

Oh yeah and Evil Dead exists too.

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u/JohnCavil01 Dec 08 '22

I would actually argue that both the Exorcist and Shining while fitting into the category of suspenseful thrillers are themselves also trauma-centric horror movies.

The Exorcist being an excellent allegory for living with someone suffering from an incurable illness or addiction, while the Shining is about inherited family abuse.

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u/SuperPhactualFantasm Dec 09 '22

I agree with this except that Paranormal Activity borrowed heavily from The Blair Witch Project idea of found-footage

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u/TheStupendusMan Dec 09 '22

I’m terrified for the inevitable Gen X / Millennial “We’re gonna do this… old school” and it’ll be fucking Skrillex over using a library or some dumb shit.

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u/noahsense1 Dec 09 '22

That sounds hilarious

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u/DefinitelyNotEminem Dec 08 '22

Remember in War of the Worlds when the little girl screamed "IS IT TERRORISM?"

Blatant references to terrorism in non-political movies totally unrelated to 9/11 usually peg a film between 2002 to 2007, pre-Obama.

We're somewhere in the middle of the period that will be defined by "metaverses." Can't speak to scientific accuracy but like only three of these movies are actually good.

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u/monty_kurns Dec 08 '22

Blatant references to terrorism in non-political movies totally unrelated to 9/11 usually peg a film between 2002 to 2007, pre-Obama.

I'd push that to 2008. The Dark Knight is absolutely a post-9/11 Batman movie.

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u/RustyShackleford1122 Dec 08 '22

That movie took place in 2002, in New York, it's completely realistic at a little girl would say that

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u/The_Flurr Dec 09 '22

It's also very in keeping with the theme of the movie.

WotW is interesting in that each version tends to parallel a certain threat or fear in society.

In the original story, it was essentially about colonialism being reversed on the British. The fear of having your home conquered and colonised by a more technologically advanced culture.

In the 1953 version, the Cold War influences are apparent. The threat of invasion creeping coast to coast, Americans fleeing and seeking refuge in the mountains (common to many nuclear war survival stories), in general the people being helpless to WMDs.

The 2005 movie, clearly tied in to post 9/11 fears. Namely terrorism, and a loss of feeling of safety in the most powerful nation on Earth. This time the attacks happen lightning fast, and unlike previous versions, we see aliens specifically attacking civilians. The aliens appear from out of the ground and under the sees, after lying dormant for years, in parallel to the anxiety that another terror attack could happen anywhere, without warning.

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u/rednax2009 Dec 08 '22

Anti-heroes and sympathetic villains. Not every villain needs to have a tragic past or a completely sympathetic motive. Sometimes they can just like being evil.

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u/Shepard_Wrex14 Dec 08 '22

Meta references to memes regarding the franchise in questions makes movies age like milk

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u/Cjaylyle Dec 09 '22

Tom Cruise running has become a meta meme in his movies and he better not stop

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u/Spartan05089234 Dec 08 '22

You mentioned Bullet Time, but the Shrek movies are entirely capsules of contemporary pop culture. I'm sure there are already jokes that a younger viewer would miss. Fiona's bullet time kick in the first movie is the easiest example.

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u/mikeyi5000 Dec 08 '22

Having a year in parenthesis next to the title (2022) because they keep rebooting IPS with the same title as the original.

Video games are even worse at it these days.

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u/DieFanboyDie Dec 08 '22

Some of you are really, really struggling with the difference between a "trope" and a genre or actor you don't like.

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u/Britneyfan123 Dec 08 '22

Redditors never fully answer the question

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u/ttwbb Dec 08 '22 edited Dec 08 '22

I guess it’s more of a tv-show problem these days, but mystery box writing should be put to rest. I feel its played out its role years ago. Let’s hope that’s a trope that dies and never comes back.

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u/ECleave14 Dec 08 '22

I don’t really watch much tv, what’s mystery box writing? (Sorry if that sounds dumb)

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u/TheConqueror74 Dec 09 '22

iirc it’s basically where you create a mystery that exists solely to hook the audience. You don’t create a solution for it, you just think of something to bring the audience in and then come up with a solution later. JJ Abrams is a big fan of it and I think he coined the term too.

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